Recent Artifacts

Recent Artifacts is an exhibition of art made by Shelley Gardner,  Dan Lythcott-Haims, Stan Chan, Art Jackson and Brad Williams. Each artist works extensively with reclaimed materials, finding ways to create new treasures from broken glass, used blue jeans, rusted metal, discarded bits and pieces, and electrified wood. The show begins with its opening reception Friday, November 15th from 5-7pm and runs through January 3rd, 2020.

 

Cinch, by Shelley Gardner (2019)

Shelley Gardner

I first became enamored with denim jeans after attending an exhibit about the life and work of Levis Strauss at the Contemporary Jewish Museum. Previously I hadn’t given much thought to the ubiquitous jeans that I had been wearing all my life. Denim jeans as we know them today were created in 1873 with the introduction of the copper rivet to reinforce the pockets and seams on canvas work pants. California gold miners were in need of durable, long lasting pants and the Levis Strauss Company produced them from a strong sail cloth originally from Nimes, France. The name “denim” is derived from “Nimes”. What I love about the fabric is how each garment takes on the individual shape of the wearer. Much like an old pair of boots or gloves that crease and fold over time, denim jeans start to resemble the bodies that inhabit them. The fabric is so unique, I try to explore the property it possesses . I start by disassembling garments into all the individual parts: waistbands, inseams, and pockets; then put them back together again in a new form. Each pair of pants holds a personal story of the wearer which gets incorporated into my artwork along the way.

 

Ankh, by Dan Lythcott-Haims

Dan Lythcott-Haims

Art invites the viewer into the head and heart of the artist. It its a challenge to see differently. Photography and found object sculpture play unique roles within the arts due to their ability to show what IS at the same time as they manipulate the point of view to manifest the vision of the artist.

I have spent my life noticing things about the built world. I notice patterns both designed and emergent; I notice the color, form and scale. Each of my series works to elevate bits of the human-made world that go unseen, ignored, or discarded by capturing a particular element of my noticing: decay, pattern, or color.

I compose my photographs within the camera, moving my body ever closer until the contents of the location, environment, and even subject are lost, and I’ve whittled the thing to its unique core. In my sculpture, I take familiar human-made objects and assemble them into unexpected presentations – by combining multiples together or by cherishing a particular piece within its own frame. In both mediums I strive to recreate the quality that caught my interest – that thing that other people don’t see.

 

Bread Clips, by Stan Chan

Stan Chan

My immigrant parents were able to buy a Victorian house in East Oakland in the 1950’s. My mother lived there for almost 70 years where stuffs have accumulated in the nooks and cranny of the house. When I was a kid, I would bury my treasures in the holes in the wall. I’ve been making shallow wooden boxes and filled small objects in them. The idea was that the boxes represented wall sections of my mother’s house where artifacts got stuck in the crevices. I nailed a clear piece of plexiglass on top of each box and drew forgettable family stories on it. Originally it was texture to obscure the objects in the box.

 

Another Planet, by Art Jackson

Art Jackson

“I really enjoy the process, exploring all its variations. I like the infinite possibilities I can see in one simple process. I pick an odd material and start working with it, and wait for a feeling that says I like something. I did that with tumbled glass, dry lake bed dust, sand, and a few painting techniques, and reclaiming family photo frames turning them into little framed canvas. I would make art all day if I could. I have 5 – 6 great process directions I can work with until I can work no more.”

 

Static, by Brad Williams

Brad Williams

“I have always been humbled by the absolute unstoppable power that mother nature produces in all the various ways she unleashes her wrath. I have had some very powerful and awe inspiring moments with our dear mother nature. I had seen a program on the fact that mankind had found a way to stimulate and produce weather. Since I often work with electricity and from one of my near death experiences had understood the amount of respect I had for it. I decided to find a way that I could, for lack of a better word, control it. From that respect and desire to control it, came this form of directing it back into a small piece of nature, and that is wood. I hope anyone who views these pieces finds a bit of joy and beauty themselves.”

 

This show will be on display through January 3rd of 2020. Please join us for its Opening Reception Friday, November 15th from 5 – 7pm. We will provide refreshments and possibly live music as well.

 

 

 

Women’s Work, an exhibit of textile work

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For our next show, we will be featuring textile art by these fine artists: Dale Eastman, Rachel Leibman, Karin Lusnak, Stacey Shuster, Ileana Soto, Sharon Steuer and Ellen Weinstein. The show opens with its opening reception on Friday, September 13th and will run thru November 8th, 2019. We will also host an artist’s talk Sunday, October 6th, from 1 – 3pm. This group of artists was curated by Rachel Leibman and she had this to say of its inspiration: “I have long been enthralled by fiber art – the weavings of indigenous peoples around the world, the quilts of Gee’s Bend, Renaissance tapestries and oriental carpets. Textile work straddles the boundary between craft and art, frequently created for functional purposes, but still with a strong sense of design and imagination. Different regions and tribes have their own unique styles for creating fiber art, often passed down from generation to generation. With globalization and modernization, these traditions are sadly being forgotten. This has encouraged me to sew, weave and dye, and to seek out like-minded people.”

“This exhibit features textile artists who work with reclaimed or recycled materials in creative and surprising ways. These artists approach their artwork with a nod to long established crafts such as sewing, quilting, embroidery and dyeing, but each artist brings a singular and contemporary approach to a traditional, and overwhelmingly women’s, mètier. I have selected artists who work with different types of source materials and produce very different kinds of creations. Some use fabric and thread while others create textiles from non-traditional materials such as discarded moth cocoons or vintage watch parts. Some of the pieces are vibrant and colorful, while others are detailed and meticulous. All are interesting, original and innovative.”

 

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Seeding the future, by Dale Eastman

Dale Eastman

Objects evoke an ambivalence in me. Even still, for more than a decade, I’ve spent half of my time making some sort of object, typically using natural, electronic or salvaged materials. Discarded moth cocoons have been my material of choice for the last several years. Like so many soft sculptures made from fibrous materials, these cocoon pieces constantly shape shift each time they’re moved. While sewing, I sometimes hold the pieces out in front of me, almost a gestational pose, and it’s true that the proliferating, generative nature of the material and the work is as mesmerizing to me as the second hand on a clock. As I sew, I periodically wonder about the point at which a particular artwork began, where it will end, or if it ever will. Isn’t each piece often, in some way, a continuation of another? Some of the cocoons are riddled with holes, allowing the viewer to see both the outside and the inside of the work. For me, though, the artwork’s hollow, lacy ephemerality has an additional focus: the space that arises around the work itself. Could it be that it is this space that I’m most in search of (even longing for?) when I’m creating artwork? Objects are necessary: they define cultural space and provide helpful boundaries that direct and delineate. But they can also circumscribe and calcify; they even risk fitting us with cataracts that blind us to what isn’t yet. That’s a shame because what I’m learning from making objects is that what isn’t is often just as important as what is.

I’m a multimedia artist and a fiction writer who originally trained as a seamstress. Frequently, I combine these practices in order to explore the subtle or overlooked connections between different aspects of our lives. My artwork has been in numerous group and solo shows the San Francisco Bay Area.

daleeastman.com

 

Rachel Leibman website photo

Temporal Tapestry, by Rachel Leibman

Rachel Leibman

I am a mixed media artist, living and working in San Francisco. After becoming enamored with textile arts during travels around the country and abroad, I taught myself to sew and dye with natural materials. My most recent project is the “Chrono”  series. I make quilts and weavings embroidered with vintage watch parts. I also create textiles by weaving together watch parts with wire and using this new textile to construct tapestries and hanging sculptures.

I love working with watch parts not only because they are beautiful and exquisite, but because they provide such a wonderful metaphor for so many aspects of life. Our stories are bound up in time. No matter what we do, time marches on, leaving us with memories and hopes.

rachelleibman.com

 

Karin Lusnak website photo

Stepping Out, by Karin Lusnak

Karin Lusnak

Originally from Pennsylvania, I worked as a Research Associate in genetics and molecular biology laboratories at the University of California in Berkeley until retiring in 1998. During this time, I developed an interest in textile arts as a student at Pacific Basin School of Textile Arts and eventually received my MFA from California College of Arts and Crafts, now CCA.

While at CCA I discovered how much I enjoy three-dimensional work. I created “Can’t Becomes Act” sometime after graduation. This piece speaks for itself.

Although my love of fiber art often takes me toward two dimensional pieces, my desire to create something sculptural again coincided with my desire to let things go.  This led me to build a house with thread spools that belonged to my mother, to another dear friend, and to myself.  “Stepping Out” is and will always be filled with memories. The image of the house is often described as a symbol of the self and the figure of the woman represents my effort to move forward.

Another of my pieces, also a house, is built with wine corks and recycled denim. It addresses many issues from politics to personal. A lovely and gentle song based on Paul Gauguin’s painting called “Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?” served as my inspiration.

“Getting THERE From HERE” describes a personal effort to move forward in life. The letters have an inner structure of sycamore branches covered with layers of fragile, pliable fabric sewn together and representing personal history and the multitude of experiences that compose a life. Bound with colorful silk fiber, the letters stand upright suggesting solidity, strength and perseverance.

KarinLusnak.com

 

Stacey Shuster website photo

Sanctuario, by Stacey Shuster

Stacey Shuster

My passion for machine quilting started in eighth grade home economics, I love the way you can create warmth and beauty for every day use, transforming old and new fabrics as women throughout the centuries have done. Quilting has largely been women’s work – from slaves in the south to immigrant women in northeast mill towns to plantation wives and pioneer women to contemporary art quilters – all with little recognition.

For this exhibit, I used donated quilts, fabric pieces and scraps to refashion them into entirely different creations. Inspired by traditional quilt patterns as well as the Gee’s Bend quilting collective of Alabama, I aim to demonstrate ways in which reclaimed fabrics focus on the current immigrant experience. As with the Underground Railroad, quilts can be used to guide endangered immigrants to safety and sanctuary. I want my quilts to tell stories that reflect and comment upon what is happening in the larger world.

 

Ileana Soto website photo

Women’s Work: Creativity, by Ileana Soto

Ileana Soto

Art has always been a theme, from the use of thread and color under the guidance of my Romanian grandmother, to a degree in Art History, from a year’s study at the California College of Art and Craft (now California College of Art) to the use of art therapy as a communication tool in my previous work as a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. I’ve created textile art in the forms of woven cloth, fiber sculptures, sewn collages, pieced quilts, and now “art quilts”.

I am passionate about bringing the themes of culture, community and Climate Change/Crisis to an “alert” stage for viewers of my pieces. I discover, inform, and encourage activism through a process of internal and external artistic expression.

My work is tied to a commitment to personal deepening and exploration. I strive to create a dialogue between myself and the cloth as I develop the piece. Layers are generated, reflected in the layering of dye, of paint, of cloth over cloth. Once the piece is completed, I listen to the viewer’s perspective and participate in that dialogue.

With my invitation to join the “Women’s Work” exhibit, I have become interested in the use of recycled materials. Each piece is done on an originally white vintage cotton or linen textile, adding fused elements that were given to me, or recycled from my own original printed fabrics, “left over” from other art pieces. I enjoyed the layering of history, known and unknown. There will be more of these pieces in my future!

My mentors include surface design artist Jane Dunnewold, Dutch batik artist Els Van Baarle, quilter and artist Angie Woolman (she has been my quilter for over 12 years), and educator/founder of Formative Psychology, Stanley Keleman, now deceased. They, coupled with my personal work in therapy, help me focus, articulate, and form an expression of the complexity of our actions as they influence our internal and external worlds.

ileanasoto.com

 

Sharon Steuer website photo

I Will Fly Away, by Sharon Steuer

Sharon Steuer

For more than thirty-five years I’ve explored techniques that allow me to move back and forth between traditional and digital tools to merge painting, drawing, printmaking and collage. In the two smaller works from my ongoing “Letters From My Father” series I recreate imaginary worlds of childhood from adult chaos. Objects and letters sent to me as a child by my estranged father form the metaphorical (and sometimes literal) background for these works. “Branded By Her Genetic Mutation” is from my “For Our Own Good” series that poses taboo questions surrounding medical privacy and genetic surveillance. In 2011, I was diagnosed with a BRCA1 genetic mutation through my Jewish ancestry. With an exponentially increased risk of developing ovarian and/or breast cancer, medical professionals advised significant surgery and genetic surveillance “for my own good.” “Branded” is a unique monoprint-transfer created by digitally collaging a watercolor-pencil drawing with a portion of my genetic code (downloaded from an unsuccessful attempt by Myriad Pharmaceuticals to patent my genetic mutation).

sharonsteuer.com

 

Ellen Weinstein website photo

Over Under 1, by Ellen Weinstein

 

Ellen Weinstein 

My art is driven by my extensive interest in textiles. I sew, quilt, weave, dye, paint and print on fabrics. My ex-mother-in-law, Barbara Eiko (Hiura) Fukuchi shared her Japanese/Hawaiian culture and fabric, warm smile and oishii (tasty) tsukemono with me. She inspired my interest in Japanese art, specifically textiles. I fell in love with Shibori tie-dyeing after seeing an exhibit curated by Yoshiko Wada many years ago. Recently, I have been learning Japanese language and calligraphy, which enhances my artistic perspective and is incorporated into my art.

In this exhibit, I deconstructed vintage Japanese kimonos and textiles to create unique appliqué art and noren curtains. Noren are fabric dividers hung between rooms, on walls, in doorways, or in windows. I appreciate that they are functionally designed to serve as signs with store names and logo, protect store goods from the elements, be room dividers, and beautify homes. My art is not strictly traditional. I embrace an aesthetic of random surprise and create art that is imperfect, with elements of East and West cultures.

For the past 30 years, I have taught art to children of all ages at the de Young Museum, Legion of Honor, and Clarendon Elementary School in San Francisco. I have a degree in Drawing and Painting from the San Francisco Art Institute.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Re-Visions

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For the show Re-Visions, San Francisco based artists Danielle Satinover and Gregory Vernitsky bring a school of creative thought together. Both artists take a similar approach to the idea of found materials and come from a background where the financial ability to source materials for work was very limited. Vernitsky, originally from the Soviet Union with limited resources to artist materials, and Satinover by a lifetime restricted by socio-economic circumstances, have instilled in them the skills to see something in the ordinary and often discarded. Both artists have been able to see beyond the ordinary to discover new interpretations.

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Tall Bird, by Gregory Vernitsky

Vernitsky combines carved and painted found wood, tossed metal, and plastic into a joyful play with time, scale, and narrative. Concepts and structures of public art, relativity of meaning, and reflection on human frailty and feelings, are realized through his innate ability to see possibilities in things as simple as a block of wood, or grace in a rusty scrap of metal.

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Rattlesnake, by Danielle Satinover

Satinover also plays with concepts of the human condition but focuses more on the connection between humans and our environments and structures.  She often takes discarded man made items to create abstract forms. Her current work has been more descriptive, but still plays with the tensions between man’s creations and natures.

Both Vernitsky and Satinover often approach their subject matter with a sense of lightheartedness. This ease with which they come to their subject matter does not take away from the significance of the work, but rather adds a dimension to the story telling and gives the viewer a place to reflect on the history of the object as well as the new vision given to it by the artists. In the end, these two artists take discarded material and use it to bring us back to ourselves and reflect on our humanity and our connections to our surroundings and each other.

Join them in celebrating this journey at the opening reception Friday, July 12th from 5-7pm. For a more in-depth exploration of the artists’ processes, an artist talk will be held Saturday, July 27th from 1-3pm. Try your own hand at their process with an art making session August 10th from 1-3pm; finally, Re-Visions will end with a closing reception Saturday, September 7th from 1-3pm.

 

FULL CIRCLE

Nothing to Lose, by Dianne Hoffman

FULL CIRCLE, a duo exhibition by Dianne Hoffman & Su Evers May 7th – July 5th, 2019, opening reception to be held Saturday, May 11th from 5 – 7pm. Artist Talk and ArtSpan Mixer: Thursday, May 30th 6-8pm.

 

San Francisco artists Dianne Hoffman and Su Evers explore through mixed media the ebbs and flows of an evolving relationship. Using found objects, reclaimed wood and manipulated photography, they collectively take the viewer on a symbolic, personal journey from admiration to crush, passion to collaboration, trials to resolution, heartbreak to healing and then back around to an unwavering alliance of friendship.

Chemistry, by Dianne Hoffman

Dianne Hoffman creates dimensional vignettes of allegories by linking organic objects with industrial and figurative remnants and combines complementary muted color schemes to harmonize dissimilar media. She was born and raised in the suburbs of Southern California and moved north to become a resident of San Francisco in 1988. The City by the Bay, with its loving embrace of everything extraordinary and endless resource of possibilities, came to cultivate and nurture her creative impulses. She has been a full time assemblage artist of salvaged and repurposed components since 2010 with work found in collections worldwide.

 

Kind Woman, by Su Evers

 

Su Evers is drawn to the worn and deteriorating  elements of weathered wood, rusty nails, found objects and trampled on paper discovered on the streets of San Francisco. For this series she has assembled photographic digital frescos and printed photographs combined with found elements to capture a poetic depth of nostalgic fluidity. Su has lived and worked in San Francisco for the past thirty years and is currently creating art in a barn in Woodside.

FULL CIRCLE will open with its reception Saturday May 11th , complete with light refreshments. The event is free, please join us for this great show! Once open, the gallery is open for viewing and purchase everyday, from 9am -4:30pm. There will also be an artist talk and ArtSpan Mixer on Thursday, May 30th from 6-8pm.

DisposABILITIES

DisposABILITIES is a group show with Denise Laws, Heather Law, Marianne Mitten, Mariana Nelson, and Kevin Tuszynski, all using repurposed materials destined to be disposed. They are all inspired to rescue and manipulate materials that are predestined for landfill. They seek and acquire these materials and are driven by their limitless possibilities.

Denise uses single use foil lined packaging like tetra-Pak and food/beverage packaging. Kevin and Marianne work with paper scraps. Mariana works with plastic bags of all sorts. Heather works with Press Mold and Slip-cast trash.

This show begins on March 7th with its opening reception from 5 – 7 pm and runs through May 3rd, 2019.

Maze, by Denise Laws

Denise Laws

Through various arrangements and repetitions, the organic forms, shapes, and patterns of “Mylar Reveries” reveal the hidden elegance of reclaimed debris used as a medium, in large as a much-needed reminder of environmental awareness. The ultimate goal of this on-going body of work is to divert the refuse, such as single-use foil lined packagings from landfill and recast into graceful topographies that echo and reflect nature, landscapes, and horizons.

 

unnamed, by Heather Law

Heather Law

Heather Law’s artwork is a dramatic depiction of American material consumerism and the resulting waste it creates. The repurposing of personal detritus makes an ethical claim on the viewer, an invitation to reflect upon one’s own daily interactions with these common objects. The transformation of trash into slip-cast ceramic sculpture emphasizes the permanency of our growing landfills in an ever-increasing disposable nation.

 

Polyglot, by Marianne Mitten

Marianne Mitten

After working on computers and websites as a graphic designer for years, Marianne really missed working with her hands. Creating art with recycled paper strips became a natural transition. There is a lot of waste when it comes to printing: make ready sheets, trimmings, folding, gluing, etc. so instead of buying paper, why not create art with this instead. Marianne never has a preconceived idea when it comes to making pieces. She allows the medium to drive the piece.

 

Fungus, by Mariana Nelson

Mariana Nelson

Mariana’s work captures material like spools of thread, plastic biohazard bags and thousands of coffee cup lids, and turns them into meaningful, thought-provoking art. First is the degree of transformation: processing and inducing techniques – turning “garbage” into art. Mariana has an even greater purpose for these objects once they are transformed. Warped plastic lids are altered to the point that, together, their petal-like forms read like beautiful, vibrant fungus, perched on trees.

 

Tranquil Whirl, by Kevin Tuszynski

Kevin Tuszynski

“Chaos/Crisis” are works made during a dark period in Kevin’s life. However, the works are not dark at all. The use of clashing  colors and mixed patterns are used to portray the disruption of his life at that time. “Road Trip” series was inspired by finding a box of road maps in a neighbor’s recycling bin. The soft greens and blues in the maps play with the bolder colors he already works with. Kevin also works with other scavenged paper, print trimmings and fabrics.

 

Beauty on the Periphery

We don’t even see most of the stuff that’s thrown away – its on the periphery of our vision. All four of us picked up discarded items and gave them intention again. These items once had a purpose. We are now revitalizing them into forms that can be aesthetically appreciated. We hope that our intention will make an impression on viewers and help them see ways to consider and appreciate the potential of everyday throwaway bits and pieces.

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Emily Cruz

Emily Cruz is an artist born and raised in Escondido, California but moved to the Bay Area in 2009 to pursue her degree in art at San Francisco State University. While she dabbles in sculptured fiber, you can find her perusing printmaking, photography and life.

 

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Dierdre Weinberg

Dierdre Weinberg is a painter and muralist in San Francisco and uses recycled canvases to paint on. For this show, she scraped the bottom of paint cans and palletes  and attached them to used canvases, showing the colorful and and interesting patterns that the paint itself creates. The material is not seen at all, much less as a possible artistic venture, which is what she likes – to see the overlooked or unseen and it in a new way.

 

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Andrea Allen

The insect invasion series combines technology, biology, and geography to stimulate an aerial view of the earth. The digital laser discs represent the ocean while the land is grid-like and abstract. This series reminds us of Pangea, how approximately 300 million years ago all land was one super continent. Maybe we need to be reminded that we all are one, and that everything was/is connected. Each piece is an island, similar yet different. The scale of the insects are much too large and invasive in comparison to their surroundings. Their wings are made from the internal programming of keyboards, both delicate and detailed. This body of work came about as a playful exploration inspired by Sci-Fi “B” movies. Technology has made insects mega powerful. We have underestimated them. Insects have bee on this planet way longer than we have and are taking it back!

My process begins with an object that intrigues me. I reconceptualize the intended purpose of that object by transforming it into another. Much could be said by the discovery of self by researching the materials we surround ourselves with. Growing up in the United States with its abundance of materials and tendencies toward wastefulness has influenced my fascination with being resourceful. Art is a part of my whole being, my raison d’être. Playful and conceptual sculptures take life.

I received my degree in Fiber Art and Combined Media Sculpture from the University of Arizona, which set the foundation for learning the importance evolving relationships. Like a tapestry, everything is connected to everything else. Patterns in nature, humanity, and technology inspire me. Color, line, form, and texture are prominent design elements in my creations. My bold and colorful sculptures incorporate many different materials and processes in order to get my ideas across.

 

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Sophie Lee

Sophie Lee uses packaging and plastic and weaves them with the idea of using them as a canvas but they become works within themselves.

 

This show opens Friday, January 11th 2019 with an opening reception from 5-7pm and will be on view thru March 1st 2019.

 

Collage & FUSE, the art of Asher and Muse

 

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Opening November 23rd, 2018, The Reclaimed Room Gallery presents Collage & FUSE, the art of Asher and Muse. It features the works of two Bayview based artists, Lani Asher and Jes Muse. Together, they bring the hard and soft in the juxtaposition of mediums. From paper to metal and vinyl to glass, Asher and Muse find whatever materials they can use and reuse to create two and three-dimensional works of art. The Opening Reception will be Thursday, November 29th from 5-7pm. This exhibit will be on view daily through January 4th with the exception of December 25th and New Year’s Day.

Lani Asher

Untitled, by Lani Asher

Lani Asher lives and works in San Francisco. She maintains a studio in a San Francisco industrial park alongside motorcycle and classic car repair shops and Chinese food wholesalers. Born in Los Angeles, Lani Asher attended the University of California Santa Barbara where she studied with Charles Garabedian, John McCracken, and James Turrel at the College of Creative Studies. Afterwards she moved to New York City and taught art, worked at an erotic bakery, and attended film classes at NYU and Columbia. She spent a year studying video, photography, book making, and film at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, New York. After living in Madrid, Spain, she landed at the San Francisco Art   Institute in the New Genres Department for graduate school. During her independent study project in Brazil she created a video examining the relationship of Brazilian Baroque art and architecture to the beauty of imperfect pearls, and transgendered Brazilian sex symbol Roberta Close. Over the years she has taught art for numerous Bay Area non profits, including teaching art to prisoners, elders, artists with disabilities, and is an online arts writer. Find her online thru laniasherart.com .

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City, by Jes Muse

Jes Muse, a resident of the Bayview here in San Francisco, is a native New Yorker with BFA from the State University of New York at Purchase. Jes is a third generation artist following in the footsteps of her grandmother, Jean Cobean, and her mother, Lisa Muse. Having found a balance between the aspects of the mid-century modern shapes and forms of Jean’s sculptural stone work and the figurative forms of Lisa’s two-dimensional works, Jes creates work ranging from mid-century inspired, brutalist works to figurative three-dimensional constructions. Jes enjoys reclaiming industrial refuse like railroad spikes, horseshoes, horseshoe nails and live-edge wood from the forest floors and northern California rivers. Jes’s incorporation of railroad spikes is a tribute to her father’s work as a Track Supervisor for the commuter railroad in New York.

The main body of Jes’s work is in steel and glass. Having different cooling and heating points, steel and glass are not the most compatible mediums. The glass becomes marred by the sparks created in the act of welding and if heated too much will crack and split apart, so it is a challenge to secure the glass well enough without overheating it. Jes dabbles in many mediums and was recently inspired by the work of Bay Area duo, t.w. five, to create pieces with adhesive vinyl, in fact, you may have seen her cruising around in the Mondrian Volvo Recently.

 

REFLECTIONS: the art of Marilynn Pardee and Marlene Aron

One imagines “traveling at the speed of light”…the other travels slowly, monitoring each breath. Marilynn Pardee works with industrial materials, Marlene Aron builds from the natural world. What holds the work of these two artists together is their love for detail, exploration, discovery, and construction of their seemingly disparate works. Marilynn works with iron, auto parts, tire prints. While Marlene uses flowers, leaves, soil, wood ash, paint and glacial rocks, layered onto canvas and wood. Theirs is a world of contrasts, and yet they sit beautifully together.

Diana

Diana, by Marilynn Pardee

Marilynn Pardee creates lamps, furniture, screens and clothing, often painted and printed with tire tracks from cars, trucks and bicycles. “Motion is the essential element of my work. The series is titled ‘Light in Translation’. I imagine traveling at the speed of light, leaving random colorful tracks. Each piece is created with scavenged and recycled materials, assembled and welded with my trusted assistant Miguel Ayala. Anchoring the show will be five beacons varying 6 to 8 feet tall, entitled Hope, Joy, Inspiration, Peace and Mirth.” Marilynn Pardee’s reflections are inspired from her early work, “reimagined and illuminated”.

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Breathing Mound: Rite of Passage, by Marlene Aron

Marlene Aron’s work – her installations, as well as her mounted wall pieces – is a meticulous layering of memory and time. A reflection from her childhood, observing the colors of earth beneath her feet, the glistening light between branches, the sounds of water in brooks and streams. Marlene layers soil, mulch, cocoa bean hulls, crushed oak galls, wood ash, melted beeswax, oil, alkyd and acrylic paint onto canvas and wood. Her environmental sculpture installations consist of glacial, garden and lava rocks, soil, oak galls, pit-fired shards of pottery, and leaves. “I move with my body and hands that which means the most to me. I move the earth combined with water, light and air. With breath, twigs, stones, broken shards of pottery, to find myself again. My work is about the building up of layers and stripping away of surface; it is about reaching for the center.”

 

Art on the card:

Marilynn Pardee: The lamp on the card is titled “Hermes,” the Greek messenger of the gods.

Marlene Aron: detail, “Searching for Meaning in the Forest of Plenty”. Mixed media, natural material and paint on canvas.

This exhibition begins Friday, September 21st with an Opening Reception featuring live music from Wishing & Bone. It will be on view through November 16th 2018.

 

 

re – imagine

Aiko Cuneo with a cut up milk carton

re – imagine is the combined works of Aiko Cuneo, Kathryn Hyde and Monica Lee. Known for their involvement with SCRAP here in San Francisco, these three artists invite you to re – imagine common everyday items in a new light, and with an artistic purpose in mind. Some of these items used in the show include: discarded books, paint chips, milk cartons, junk mail, coffee sleeves and postage stamps. This exhibition opens Friday, July 20th with a public reception from 5-7pm and can be viewed through September 15th 2018.

 

Waking Up Happy, by Aiko Cuneo

From A family of makers, Aiko Cuneo worked with teachers, students and families as a teaching artist in San Francisco schools. She combines a variety of materials to make two and three-dimensional constructions. SCRAP, the Scrounger’s Center for Reusable Art Parts, has been an ongoing source of materials that inspire Cuneo’s work. Her work for this show is made with paper, security envelopes, bar codes, buttons, sewing notions, milk cartons, 45 rpm records and paint swatches. “The art of making something from someone else’s discards is food for my soul as it brings joy and satisfaction from the challenges of transformation.”

 

Remains, by Kathryn Hyde

Kathryn Hyde‘s artistic endeavors include sculpture, printmaking, collage and photography. Hyde’s investigation of architecture and design is found in the elemental details in her sculpture, etchings, and photography. Her creative spirit was influenced by her mother’s interest in architecture and ceramics.

Most recently, she is constructing sculpture incorporating reclaimed cardboard and decaying materials. The sequence is created from common, everyday materials including withered wood, discarded cardboard and rusted metal work. Hyde scavenges from city streets, generous building contractors and reuse yards. She carefully pieces the object together, rather like completing a puzzle.

Hyde’s work is based on her concern for the natural environment and losses from natural disasters, especially the recent fires in California. These sculptures depict her affinity for the land, and her desire to preserve earth’s precious materials and natural resources. Her hope for the future is sustained by the dedicated individuals and organizations working creatively to protect the air, water and soil.

Hyde’s work is exhibited in San Francisco at the Thoreau Center for Sustainability and the SF Department for the Environment.

 

 

Untitled, by Monica Lee

After 30 years as a freelance film photographer in San Francisco, Monica Lee has returned to her first love of making things out of reclaimed and found materials sometimes using discarded books, inner tubes, bottle caps, postage stamps, found paper and fabric in her artwork. Her childhood was spent watching her dad making and building things large as the family home to small pieces of folk art using primarily reclaimed materials. At a young age she wanted to build and make things just like her dad and they collaborated on many projects from childhood to adulthood! Her dad Philip was her biggest supporter and inspiration in her artwork until his passing at age 97. Monica dedicates her artwork for this show to her beloved dad.

Monica lives in San Francisco with her husband Jonathan Rapp and their children Elana and Samuel. Monica teaches creative reuse workshops at Ruth’s Table, S.C.R.A.P., The San Francisco Campus for Jewish Living, FabMo and the San Francisco Center for the book. Monica blogs occasionally at http://www.artfulrecrafter.com .

 

 

 

Crossover – 2 Artists, 6 degrees of Separation

CrossOver – 2 Artists, 6 degrees of Separation is a collaboration between Reddy Lieb and Jennifer Ewing. Each artist has cross-pollinated each other’s approach to express the ways we all are connected. Their art is designed around a continuum of lines that are the underlying energies that hold all things together in a common space.

Through their exploration of painting, sculpture, and mixed media pieces, all created and inspired by recycled materials (mirrors, paper, plastic and string)they are crossing over any boundaries of separation to express the greater whole.

The artists have collaborated recently on Currents, a 2015 exhibition at the China Brotsky  Gallery in the SF Presidio using repurposed materials to inspire their work. They meet regularly to critique their work and share new concepts for exploration. Both artists are passionate about reusing found materials in their art and in their concerns for the health of the planet.

Reddy Lieb has created a wall of paintings and mixed media pieces that includes both abstract and realistic imagery, old and new, opposite forces that coalesce into a whole. Everything is connected…even seemingly random and unrelated materials, or concerns.

Jennifer Ewing continues her work with the symbol of the Spirit Boat as a metaphor for passage. In this exhibit she has created a large ship that pulls along a trail of plastic debris that references our tragic and growing Sea of Plastic. Her smaller sculptures are inspired by Christo’s technique of wrapping subjects and are made using light fixtures that become mysterious yet familiar feeling objects.

 

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Reddy Lieb

“Art is a form of nourishment (of consciousness, the spirit), ” – Susan Sontag

This is how I describe my passion for art and the ideas that I explore through mixed media. Artists have transformed found materials into “art” for as long as there have been artists. I have been using recycled materials in my work for over 35 years. In 2000, I was awarded an artists residency at Recology, where I put together a portfolio of work based on my exploration of the mythical character Demeter, and her dilemma in the 20th century. After completing this residency, in 2002, I went back to graduate school at CCAC, when I experienced the collapse of American idealism after 9/11. Working with broken glass, burnt wood and grown grass I built installations. My final installation was creating a glass tower of cards that referenced the myth of King Minos and the collapse of the kingdom on the isle of Crete.

Sites of transformation have always interested me. They are mysterious spaces, a fertile void, ripe for renewal. I created work based on demolition sites and the Phoenix rising.

Now, in the midst of major social, political and economic upheaval, I am exploring the illusion of security.  What we need in this time is to know how we are all connected, like mycelium of mushrooms that forms an immense underground communication network. Referencing sacred geometry and ideas from the string theory I am creating connections.

“The artist vocation is to send light into the human heart.”  – George Sand

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Jennifer Ewing

A life long artist, Jennifer has worked as a teaching artist, an illustrator, muralist, entrepreneur and workshop facilitator.

Her major theme of “Spirit Boats” began in 2005 as a response to the death of her father and is dedicated in his honor. Her boats become symbols of transformation that are created as sculpture, paintings, drawings, prints and installations that reference one’s movement through life.

In her personal work and workshops, Jennifer uses recycled materials with an emphasis on plastic and paper. She is inspired by the universality of Spirit Boats and demonstrates how little boats can be made of cut-apart plastic water bottles or stained papers. She is also influenced by how the artist, Christo, has wrapped objects that has given her new ideas on how to treat recycled lights that have become sculptures.

Jennifer has lived and worked in an historic SF Mission District artist community, Developing Artists, since 1986. She has exhibited her work widely in various Bay Area venues over the past twenty years with solo shows including: Kimball Gallery, deYoung Museum, Living Shaman Museum of the SF Presidio, Gallery 190, UCSF Memory & Aging Center, and Ruth’s Table. She is a senior teaching artist at the SF Fine Arts Museum and a museum educator at the Contemporary Jewish Museum where she works with adult and children’s programs, designs projects and leads tours of exhibitions.

Since 1989 she has ran her mural business, Ewing and Germano, with husband, Leo Germano that specializes in fine arts services for commercial and residential clients.

In 2012, she launched two additional businesses for organizational learning: How to Navigate Change for Team Building and Making Your Mark Now, offering drawing programs in partnership with Leo Germano. As an artist and entrepreneur, she is a bridge to help people incorporate art and right brain thinking into their daily lives.

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This exhibition is on view through the 13th of July, 2018.

WHAT IF?

Opening March 16th, 2018 The Reclaimed Room is excited to present WHAT IF? a group exhibition featuring the puzzling creations of three Bay Area artists whose process-based work draw attention to societal chaos and conflict. WHAT IF? artists Clint Imboden, James Shefik and Jamie Banes provoke viewers to question the reality and truths of the structures displayed before them. Although recognized for their use of everyday materials in unexpected and unusual ways, these artists’ sculptures and installations also stimulate and challenge their audiences’ preconceptions of material, purpose, and intent. This exhibition will be on view through May 11th 2018.

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Crutches, by Clint Imboden

“I come to making art with the perspective of a therapist. Just as a good therapist can act as a catalyst for change in a client, good art should elicit a strong reaction from the audience, provoking them to explore the reasons why they’ve been affected.”

“I find my materials at local flea markets and estate sales. I start with the artifacts of daily living, things that most people overlook: battered globes, worn shoes, and dilapidated tools. I’m drawn to old materials because they foster purposeful imperfection in my art, an attribute that’s connected to their previous lives. I use them for their connotative, associative or narrative possibilities. My installation work is tactile and handmade; as an artist, I focus on process and on topical, issue-based content.”

“Viewing my artwork is not meant to be a passive experience; it involves reading, deciphering, taking the initiative to engage physically and psychically with text and objects. I use materials that challenge my audience to consider multiple references in order to understand the full meaning of a piece. I want people to be caught up in the experience of my work, just as I am, in making it. My goal is to have them come away from an encounter with the work knowing something new about themselves.”

 

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Insomnia, by James Shefik

Conceptual, multidisciplinary artist James Shefik lives in Oakland. Along with making art in his studio, he is a scenic artist and scenic foreman on movie and television sets (Sense8, Thirteen Reasons Why, Steve Jobs, Big Eyes, Chasing Mavericks, and Milk, to name a few).

Primarily a sculptor, Shefik creates artwork that reveals his strong concern for the environment, for the government’s tyranny of purposeful invasion of our privacy, and social political absurdity that often accompanies concentrations of power.

His latest work employs photographic prints to mutate small transient into an almost theatrical experience. His work has been exhibited at the Aqua Art Fair in Miami, the Richmond Art Center in Richmond, CA, Sanchez Art Center in Pacifica, CA, and Autobody Fine Art in Alameda, CA. Shefik was a recipient of a SF Weekly Mastermind Grant in 2011.

 

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Nominative Determinant, by Jamie Banes

“Growing up in a blue-collar construction family, I connected with tools and materials at an early age. Exposure to the job site as a youth helped shape my interest in architecture and the ever-changing organism of the built environment. These early experiences continue to inform my work and contribute to my own sense of place and identity.”

“The built environment serves as a multilayered record of human activity, mirroring the effects of society’s needs and motives over time. The concept of structures as living entities is a natural starting point for my experiments, often stemming from themes of origin and decay within the urban landscape. The breakneck speed at which this life cycle revolves in the Bay Area underscores the socioeconomic and political issues of our time and further influences my work.”

“My process results in quirky assemblages reminiscent of childhood forts or tree house constructions in miniature. My most current work presents as a collection of eccentric architectural models and maps, wryly alluding to the seriousness of many ominous societal issues on our collective horizon. The materials I collect are typically found, bartered or bargained for in keeping with my inclination to reuse when possible.”

 

 

 

 

CONFIGURATIONS: Three Artists Assemble Themselves

This upcoming show, opening Friday January 12th 2018, will feature puppets, sculpture, jewelry and furniture, all deeply crafted from 100% salvaged material. The three artists, Francesca Borgatta, Charles Foss, and Miles Epstein, each bring work with personality, humor, and a recognition that a long studio practice will always reveal new surprises. Especially when the work is assembled in a new context and new configurations.

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Blue Monkey, by Francesca Borgotta

Francesca Borgotta has been building puppets since the 1970’s, having been apprenticed with Bread and Puppet Theater in New York.  Since then, she has lived a full life of dance, drama and puppetry.  She comes to the Reclaimed Room from the East Bay, where she works at the East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse.

“To make my artwork, I look for recycled materials. I bind random things together, say a crab’s shell and an insect husk. Then I add new things until they appear as a single configuration, a form which needs completion. I like puppets because each one has a name and a story, and is meant to be manipulated.”

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Wooden Tablet, by Francesca Borgata

“At the Reclaimed Room, I will present each puppet with bits of dialogue to indicate the story. The wall hangings include a set of tablets describing these five elements: wood, fire, earth, metal and water. I started these in 2015 when I was studying Chinese traditional medicine where each element is assigned a color, a season, an emotion, and other qualities. To understand this interaction, I gathered objects in that material and arranged them on a plywood panel.”

“I am very happy to be showing my work in the Reclaimed Room. This wide open space celebrates both the aesthetic beauty and practical value of recycled materials. Artists are encouraged to work together to plan their show, and explore possibilities for collaboration, to generate a much-needed sense of community. Hopefully, through our artwork, we can encourage a sense of ecological awareness.”  fborgotta@puppetfigures.com

 

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Crystalline Spheres, by Charles Foss, aka c.H.u.K.

Charles Foss, also known as c.H.u.K, brings to the gallery work from his “Landfill Interception Project”, specifically his “Fauna” series. From his website freektures.com: “..an exploration of inanimate evolutionary improbabilities, using common everyday items which have been deemed useless, cast aside, and abandoned.” Originally from Maine, Charles has been a toy maker, prop fabricator, performance artist, part of a circus crew, a magicians assistant and a scary clown pie maker (among other things!) Currently he is creating “Funky Found Flora” and “Decolletorations ~ talismans created with magical parts and pieces we step on every day.”

 

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Miles Epstein

 

Miles Epstein uses salvage materials and simple tooling to design and build art and other useful objects. His work ranges from furniture, sculpture and installation and uses paper, metal, cork and concrete. By allowing the qualities of his materials to drive many design decisions, Miles’ work is sometimes unpredictable and often quirky. The work is often very labor intensive but strives to appear natural, even relaxed.

For this show he says: “I’m revisiting the west-facing windows in the gallery, working with two new materials for me: clear acrylic sheets and colored, tumbled glass. By gluing the glass to the sheets with two-part epoxy I hope to create a hybrid visual experience, combining elements of graphic design, stained glass and painting. The process is exacting and fussy but has great potential for beauty. I am also bringing to the floor of the gallery a new collection of cafe style tables built primarily from cardboard and cork. The cardboard comes from salvaged bicycle boxes, and the cork is a mixture of reused  rolled cork sheeting and recycled wine corks. These materials are very familiar to me and I’ve been using them in furniture work for over 12 years. But they still amaze me with their resilience, strength-to-weight ratio, and their subtle color palette.

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Cork Cafe Tables, by Miles Epstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

for the LOVE of ART

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This is a group show honoring the tradition of gathering around the table among friends and socially producing art for pleasure. It will feature multiple mosaic artists, metal sculptures, craft jewelry, knitted critters, crochet, cast paper, glass tableware and original lighting designs, all sourced from reused materials. We open this show on November 17th from 5-7pm and it will run through January 5th 2018.

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Dana Albany

“From the very grandest scale to the very minute, my artwork is a medley of recycled and discarded materials. I enjoy working alone, as well as collaborating amongst many! Gathering together with fellow artists has been a meeting ground of genuine support and swirling creativity. It has taken me out of my darkest moments, inspired me, and brought depth to my art, that left alone would not have arisen.”

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Haideen Anderson

Haideen Anderson works with a variety of materials in her sculptures but focuses mainly on paper-casting for mask-making and mild steel for nature and dream influenced sculptures. With both the masks and the metal, she is interested on exploring pairs of opposites and the healing potential in art.

The masks that she makes are from reused materials – paper grocery bags for the casting with the surface collaged on with out-of-date calendars, old magazines, cigarette packages, etc. Much of the metal she uses is also made from scraps. In a few sculptures this is obvious. They are constructed from car parts, door knobs, cake pans and other recognizable objects.

She is glad to be part of Reclaimed Room’s exhibit “for the LOVE of ART” with so many artists who are a part of the Art Nite gatherings. Making art is often such a solitary activity. Coming together, each person with their own project to work on, balances the lone time. Old friendships are strengthened and new ones are formed on Art Nite. The atmosphere is warm and supportive. Love of creativity is the unifying force.

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Art Nite participants,clockwise starting from the top left corner: Angel Gurgovits, Chula Camp,         Haideen Anderson, Dana Albany, Aaron Harlan, Dave Hasse and his mother, Kathleen Hasse.

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Chicken Wire-Glass Platter by Lauren Becker of Recycled Glassworks

Lauren Becker can occasionally be found at the yard (B R) sorting re-usable window glass and shelves for her work. The up cycling process involves cutting the glass to size and a kiln firing that softens the glass just enough to render it flexible. In this state it can be embossed with design from below, enhancing the aquatic virtues of glass and the natural aqua tint present in plate-glass. An extensive line of functional tableware with dishes, bowls and serving pieces has evolved in a wide variety of sizes. Currently working through a pile of glass display shelves from See’s Candy warehouse in Daly City, Recycled Glassworks has been diverting plate glass from Bay Area landfill since 1996. More info on her work can be found at recycledglassworks.com

 

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Chula Camp

“I am a self-taught jewelry designer and work with traditional and uncommon materials. Every collection is designed and hand-made be me one at a time. I work in a tiny art studio in the historic Dogpatch District near the central waterfront in San Francisco. I have been designing wire and glass jewelry since 2003. In 2010 I entered my first competition in the recycled category and won. The excitement of winning inspired me to explore more options of designing jewelry with broken, found or discarded trash.”

“It’s been almost a decade since the recycling design challenge. Since then I have rescued over 48 different waste items and made many pieces into reclaimed and wearable art. Some of these rescued items have included chop stick rests, retired traffic signal lenses, key hole covers, chandelier crystals, bullet casings, champagne boxes, calendars, credit card tape cores, buttons, quilter’s scraps and vintage spools..”

“I love sketching new ideas and discovering the value in what others may consider junk. Creating new jewelry from broken, found and discarded objects fulfills my current creative instinct. There is no such thing as away. When we throw anything away it must go somewhere.”

 

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Kat Pk Delurgio

“When I rediscovered crochet in 2013 there was an ‘A-ha’ moment. I was bed ridden in post-trauma-recovery, and this act of crocheting was Good Medicine. It tickles both sides of my brain as the process blends the sensual aspects (texture, color, visual aesthetics) and thinky-thinky (math & structural engineering.) The first hook I used was MacGuyver’ed from a chopstick, duct tape and a paper clip. About 95% of my materials are secondhand scores. I enjoy experimenting with non-conventional materials and find great inspiration while Crafternooning with friends!”

 

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Sconce designed by Michael Donnelly

Mike was drawn to shadows and light, natural forms, and dumpster diving at an early age. These influences are ever present in his work with lamps and light fixtures.

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Michael Donnelly with Dana Albany at Burning Man 2017

 

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Angel Gurgovits

Angel Gurgovits has been a recycler her whole life.  She has worked at Building REsources for 13 years and counting, the last two years also curating the Reclaimed Room Gallery as well. She began to make mosaic art with Dana Albany back in 2010 and the advent of Art Nite was born. The duo was joined by others and they collaborated on many great projects together, including the Youth Educational Spacecraft which toured Maker’s Fair , Burning Man and Las Vegas in 2013.

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Youth Educational Spacecraft, designed by Dana Albany

“Learning how to mosaic really changed and enriched my life. I feel like I can recycle anything into something beautiful with just a little glass and glue. My favorite projects now also include functional light fixtures,  and each day I am inspired to make more!”

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Marble Lamp, by Angel Gurgovits

 

 

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Anne Jatta

“I love knitting. Since I learned to knit in 1st grade (in Denmark), knitting has been a big part of my life. I can never just sit, must have needles in my hands. These creatures, composed of re-used materials, have been so much fun to make.”

 

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Ady Larsen

“I think of mosaic as life! When life falls apart (and our dishes) we have the option to transform the results. We pick up the pieces and glue them back together, allowing the unlimited possibility of fun colors to reflect the beauty in our world.”

 

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Pauline Tolman, adding some touches to Dana Albany’s Tara Mechani

Pauline Tolman is a San Francisco artist best known for her large scale sculpture and architectural installations. She has achieved three major public commissions as well as a number of site specific commissions. She also enjoys figurative bronze work. During the pour for one such sculpture she was fascinated by the “splash,” the over pour of bronze into the surrounding sand. The very raw, primal forms created by this splash are the core and inspiration for the wall charms displayed here.

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Bronze “Splash” Wall Charm by Pauline Tolman

 

“All of us who are in this show have spent time at the table, collaborating on something together and enjoying each others company whilst doing so. We have formed a strong bond with one another and continue to work together as often as we can. It is with great pleasure that we present this show, for the LOVE of ART.”

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Works by Connie Murray, Martha Jones and Kim Larson

 

Opening September 15th, 2017 we have a show not to be missed!!! Three incredibly talented mosaic artists will be featured together for the first time: Connie Murray, Kim Larson and returning Reclaimed Room Artist from 2013, Martha Jones.

Connie Murray

Connie Murray is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Person-Centered Expressive Arts therapist. She has been artistic all her life; doodling, building lamps, sculpture out of obscure objects, and painting the interior of her home a variety of colors. Fifteen years ago Connie began tiling household furniture as an expressive outlet not only for herself but also in her practice as a healing resource for addiction recovery. In her practice following the sequential PCEAT approach all artistic venues offer a path to personal growth and healing.

As an older adult diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Dyslexia she has found that mosaic sculpture is a perfect medium for her artistic expression. The meditative quality of mosaics provides a vehicle for gaining an in-depth understanding of life experiences, and to organize ideas. Additionally this meditative quality has allowed her to seek a graduate degree as it structures time to process research. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Psychology at San Francisco’s Saybrook University with a certification in Expressive Arts under the guidance of Natalie Rogers, PhD., REAT.

Connie’s mosaic adventure crossed over from furniture to mannequins when she was given a dancing figure and decided it was the perfect platform for expressing the frustrations of the transition through menopause. Her creations include a variety of glass, mirror and found objects in strong colors representing feelings involved with women’s issues, death and life transition, and the women who are currently or in the past have been an important part of her life.

Mosaic work by Connie Murray

 

Martha Jones at work in her studio.

As a Reuse and Upcycle artist, Martha’s work is created from discarded materials. Her quest for abandoned treasures are found on the street, in salvage yards, in thrift stores, yard sales or gifted, just to name a few.

Degreed as an Interior Designer, but with a passion for salvaging, Martha’s work is lively and humorous. Her color combinations and compositions reflect her professional training and inner talents.

“Interior Design has always been my first passion, although salvaging was a close second. I grew up just outside of Boston. I remember looking forward to trash night where you can go out and search street after street for goodies. The reuse passion never ended…things from the past have a soul.”

Mosaic work by Martha Jones

 

Kim Larson

Kim Larson’s exquisite mosaic work honors organic form as well as delights the eye. Using stained glass, broken china, recycled glass & mirror, found objects, etc as tesserae, Kim works in a playful and unique style.

“My current series, as with all my mosaics, is about the interplay between recognizable shapes and surprising textures & colors. I create very recognizable shapes (substrates) and then ‘flesh them out’ so to speak, with surprising juxtapositions of color and lay patterns. ”

“I find mosaics to be crazy-making! At times I have to admit I walk that fine line between sanity and insanity because each cut, each piece, each color, each placement has to be perfect! Specifically, I like to work with sparkly, mirrored, textured, brightly_colored glass, recycled glass and found objects. I feel like I am painting with light.”

The reflective qualities of the glass force the viewer to move around the piece to see it truly take shape and reveal itself. The recycled china, tiles and found objects create an intimacy with the viewer when recognizable things are used in new ways. “Mosaic art is not a static medium. The play of light adds an extra dimension one doesn’t find in many other art forms.”

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The show will run from September 15th through November 10th.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport Me

 

 

We are thrilled to present Transport Me, a dynamic two-person exhibition featuring sculptor Kat Geng and figurative painter Jon Levy-Warren. Using the once modern -and now extinct- phone booth as a central metaphor, Transport Me investigates what it means to travel to another realm, another time or another space without actually moving. Mining found-object canvasses  sourced from the streets of San Francisco and the scrapyard, the artists have built a colorful collection of works: Geng with her playful repurposings and Levy-Warren with his portraits of refracted reverie; which explore objects and the power they have to carry us away. The exhibition will be on view July 14 through September 8, 2017 with an opening reception on Friday, July 14 from 5-7 pm.

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Visual art, music, literature, food, film, books, television, colors, sounds, smells, drugs, and technology all act as transportation vessels with the uncanny ability to tug on our imagination and memory. But where does this leave the phone booth and other relics of outmoded virtual travel? Where do these technological fossils take us? To whom do they connect us? Are they places of nostalgia? Do they transform us into Superman? Or, like Doctor Who’s Tardis, whose police booth literally can take us anywhere in space and time? By asking these questions, Geng and Levy-Warren begin the journey of discovery, examining how free thought allows us to escape our physical surroundings.

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Drawing on her transitory lifestyle, Geng’s artistic approach allows the viewer to explore her whimsical alterations and humorous point of view wherein a whole, wild universe can be accessed by stepping thru the door (or phone booth) into her creative mind. She combines found objects form a new narrative based on common associations the items hold. In so doing, she requires that her audience put forth effort as they use their imagination to travel to new and unexpected places, giving old gadgets new meaning.

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Levy-Warren creates with the intention of conveying his audience out of their physical bodies and into an otherworldly setting. Through this welcomed displacement from reality to fantasy, he encourages viewers to learn to see and understand themselves from a different perspective. The figures in his compositions are characteristically staring off into space, connected to one another in the ether, yet isolated in real life. His subjects are at once physically present and absent having transcended the material world into immaterial space.

About the Artists

As an itinerant Colombian-American artist, Geng has lived in over 100 houses in the Bay Area (as well as a dozen in Massachusetts and Mexico), becoming adept at transporting her belongings. She began her professional relationship with objects while working as an art conservator in North Adams, MA and Guanajuato, MX and continues to bring them wherever she goes. Geng has shown extensively in San Francisco, CA and was awarded artist residences at The Midway Gallery in 2016 and the Vermont Studio Center in 2017. Recently, she curated Om, I’m Home, an interactive exhibition at The Luggage Store Gallery in San Francisco and enjoyed a solo show at Counterpoise. She received a BA in Art History from Bard College, Annandale-On-Hudson, NY.

Levy-Warren grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan as a nervous wreck. There were people everywhere. He figured out that by focusing on individuals and becoming fascinated by them, the masses of humanity and the world itself faded away.  He has spent his life allowing himself to be transported into other people’s little worlds. He studied film and video making alongside drawing, painting and printmaking as an undergraduate at Princeton University. Levy-Warren lived in Brooklyn, NY and Stockholm, Sweden before beginning to bounce around the Bay Area in 2012. He continues to be inspired primarily by people and their environs. He has shown extensively at galleries in San Francisco, including the Luggage Store Gallery.

 

 

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On Sunday, July 2nd, we will host a closing reception for our current show, departure. New works have been installed by Miles Epstein and Tim Armstrong, in place of ones that were sold.

Miles Epstein with his sold tissue painting; nicely framed by Rachel Leibman’s “Daily Dose”.

Tim Armstrong ‘s new art; made from branches, flour, instant coffee, burlap and elastomeric paint.

The celebration will be held July 2nd, 4:30 – 7pm. The show closes a week later, on Friday, July 7th.

 

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departure is the work of these five material driven artists: Tim Armstrong, Ramiro Cairo, Katerina Connearney, Miles Epstein and Rachel Leibman. They are gathering together for the first time to create an art and shopping experience in the most immersive way possible, in a place where things “just show up”. Innovated objects will be presented in a way that can inspire you to see them in a different light. The show opens Friday, May 12th and will run thru July 7th.

 

 

Tim Armstrong

“Of economic necessity and invention, I have discovered a way to make monotype prints with materials salvaged from dumpsters. My skull prints are made using tar paper, mop heads and camping fuel gathered from dumpsters near construction sites and homeless encampments, I like the simple suggestion of a burning fuse. Mounted on the back of each print is the original collage. The wall sized work is an experiment using old car gaskets, stove burners and instant coffee. Originally conducted on a cement floor, the drawing was then coated with elastomeric roof paint and burlap and peeled off the ground. I am mainly interested in using undiscovered processes as an artist, in containing a method as it leads to a metaphor.”

 

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Skull Print

 

Ramiro Cairo

 

Ramiro Cairo is an Argentine artist, based in San Francisco. His speciality is the reuse of disused objects and technological scrap, creating works of art and design, such as TV mirrors, TV coffee tables, circuit board lamps, vacuum tube figurines and sculptures in limited editions.

“Most of my work navigates the space between design and art, between functionality and personality, combining creativity, surprise, humor and reuse. I’m motivated by finding a different use for objects originally built for a particular  purpose. My challenge is to find them a new line of work, giving them an extended lifespan and making them useful again.”

“Bricks for good is my latest work in which I make objects out of bricks. The tape dispenser is the first object of this series in which the pieces are shaped by chiseling down the brick as if it was a sculpture, using a hammer, chisels and an angle grinder. Why bricks? Well, I just want to give them a good use instead using them for a nonsensical Wall.”

 

Tape Dispenser

 

Katerina Connearney

Katerina Connearney is a figurative artist and woodworker originally from Greece and currently living in San Francisco. In this exhibit, the focus is on making functional furniture pieces from (almost) all recycled or reclaimed materials. The majority of the materials were, appropriately enough, found here at Building Resources. “One never knows what beautiful and promising bit of rusty metal or weathered wood one will come across when ambling around (the yard), and more often than not we go home with these treasures not knowing why or how we will use them. The fun is in playing with them – rearranging, bending, taking apart, putting back together, and eventually seeing what is recreated.”

 

BR Cabinet

 

Miles Epstein

“This is the second time I’ve had the opportunity to show work at The Reclaimed Room and I am honored and inspired to be showing with four other talented artists. We all know this space in our own way, and all work very independently and in different materials: brick, canvas, wood, plastic and metal, objects of interest, tissue and paper.”

“Of note is the name of this show. Hanging out at the yard I am most inspired when someone leaves with something encouraging, be it an idea, an inspiration, or a doorknob. departure speaks to the inspiration of the material object.”

 

 

 

tissue painting – blue head

 

Rachel Leibman

Rachel Leibman is a mixed media artist from San Francisco. Her artwork spans the gamut from tiny two-dimensional collages to room-sized installations. The unifying thread in all her pieces is repetitiveness and obsessive attention to detail. Leibman’s process is extremely meticulous and labor-intensive.

For the “departure” exhibit, Leibman has chosen to display two large installations from her “Vessels” series. “Elijah Makes the Rounds” is composed from vintage kiddish cups; goblets used in Jewish rituals such as Passover seders. With a sly sense of humor, this piece evokes sweet childhood memories. “Daily Dose” is composed from hundreds of plastic prescription pill bottles, collected from Leibman’s friends, family, and her own personal stash. This piece is a commentary on the state of the pharmaceutical industry in the U.S.

Leibman’ artwork has been exhibited in numerous solo and group shows on both coasts. Her collages are part of many private and public collections including Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco, American Airlines HQ in Dallas, and the Art Collection at the Hebrew Home in New York City.

Elijah Makes the Rounds

Daily Dose

 

 

OFFCUTS

OFFCUTS is a collection of work and collaborations inspired by what is left behind. The incidental shapes and forms, cut and discarded, reimagined as entirely new works. The show was originally inspired by the vast amount of offcuts from a furniture commission in which over 50% of the material was surplus shapes. Eran and Roland created four generations of pieces from the same original material, each one directly inspired and defined by the one before it.

Eran Dayan and Roland Blandy have been working together as [RE]Union Creative since 2015. Together they collaborate on costume furniture, architectural elements and sculpture in the Bay Area.

Many thanks to Bayshore Metals for donating their offcuts for this show.

These works will be on display and for sale through May 5th, with the Opening Reception to be held Friday, March 10th from 5:30 – 8PM. There will be refreshments, the event is free of charge and located within Building REsources.

Dreamare, with Kaytee Papusza

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Opening Saturday, January 14th from 5-7pm in the Reclaimed Room.

Dreamare is a showcase of wearable art, couture costumes and upcycled fashion that illustrates the process and dichotomy of dreams becoming nightmares, and the space that exists in the shifting grey area between those two worlds. The heart of this particular showcase revolves around the existence of the artist in the modern day world, and explores the fine line that can easily become blurred in the shift between beautification and gentrification — or rather anti-gentrification, in this case. Many of the works and installations in this show will convey the fragility of artist created realities, which can easily crumble to demolishment, becoming lost in the constraints of our capitalist driven cultural and political climate.

Artist Bio

Papusza Couture artist and designer, Kaytee Papusza, currently resides in Los Angeles where she works as a couturier, costume designer and fabric archivist. She enjoys traveling  with her work and frequently visits NYC and The Bay Area, both places where she previously resided. She creates clothing, couture and costumes of all kinds, and is best known for her one of a kind conceptual fine art couture collections, made using unconventional materials, hand crafted textiles and artisan techniques. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The New York Post, Vogue Italia, Sang Blue and Belle Armoire.

Also featured in this show will be accessories by Mad Elegance.

Cover image “It Will Be Ours” by Ransom and Mitchell.

For more images and information, please visit http://www.papuszacouture.com and also http://www.madelegance.com.

Dreamare will be available to view January 14th – March 4th 2017.

 

 

Reduce, Reuse, Make Art.

Michelle Echenique, in her studio, with “Jerome”.

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Michelle Echenique is a mixed media artist living and working in San Francisco, CA. She is known for use of found and cast off materials in her 2 -and 3 – dimensional work.

Sourcing and collecting a wide range of paper, wood, and metal and any eye catching scraps is an ongoing practice and integral to the artistic process. Making use of the innate histories and forms of found material, she works to create something wholly new that hints at the familiar. The richly layered, textured results exude both joy and mystery inviting scrutiny.

In the Reclaimed Room she’ll be showing a mix of furniture and assemblage. This 3 – dimensional work provides an exciting challenge in figuring how to assemble the piece in a visually interesting way while keeping it structurally sound. It’s a puzzle requiring both physical and mental reflection.

Also on view will be several pieces from the Cats I’ve Known Series. These cats incorporate “fur-like” corrugated cardboard, reclaimed window frames with cat “ears” on top, and copper whiskers.

Outside the studio, Michelle is a Teaching Artist for ArtSpan participating in Art for City Youth and Community Engagement Projects. She is also involved with the temporary art space, Hayes Valley Art Works.

We are excited to have Michelle to be loading in next week!!

Opening Reception will be held on November 4th from 4:30 – 7pm and will also feature live music from the Big Band Surfers Polka Trio!!

Also tune into our page on FaceBook!

Link up for more information here:

http://www.michelleechenique.com

Present Ground: October 1 – November 5, 2016

Special Event this Saturday: https://www.facebook.com/events/1325815630783225/

 

 

 

 

Closing Reception Announced

This Saturday, October 8th, 2016 we will have a closing reception for our “Lost and Found Beatles” show. If you missed the opening, then this show is for YOU!

From 5:00 thru 8:00 pm, fearturing a TRIUMPHANT return performance of J. Raoul Brody, playing his fave Fab Four songs, and YOU on lead vocals!

We will have special “last chance” deals on Lost & Found Beatles Merchandise Prints, Posters, T-Shirts and Postcards!

The show will remain open for viewing up until October 20th.

Lost and Found Beatles

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Opening  at 6pm August 29th 2016 we present an exhibition of RARE previously unpublished photos of the Beatles!
Dave Seabury is back in our room with photos from the Beatles last concert at Candlestick Park. 30 years ago he discovered a contact sheet of amazing images of the Beatles by an as yet unidentified photographer. The images have been digitized, restored and enlarged to commemorate the 50th anniversary of that last Beatles concert. The Opening Reception will also feature live music by The Chuckleberries and J. Raoul Brody on keyboard. The show will be up through October 20th 2016. Reclaimed Room is open 8 Days a week for this exhibit 9am-4:30pm, excluding major holidays. More details can be found in this article published by SF Gate/San Francisco Chronicle.  Click onto the link below to read the article.

http://www.sfgate.com/entertainment/article/Mystery-photos-of-the-Beatles-last-concert-on-8393320.php

Coming soon! Reclaimed Recology

For our next show we have teamed up with the Recology Artist in Residence program and will feature works from a dozen local artists who participated as residents. The lineup of artists as it reads on the postcard is Mike Farruggia (’05), Michael Kerbow (’04), Linda Raynsford (’00), Karrie Hovey (’12), Dana Albany (’03), Jim Growden (’91), Barbara Holmes (’08), Ed Clapp (’06), Andrew Junge (’05), Mark Feigenbaum (’05), Viviana Paredes (’05) and Paul Cesewski (’08).  During their residency, each artist was granted scavenging rights in “the dump” and had 24 hour access to the company’s well equipped art studio. Our exhibition will have one or more pieces from each artist and will be shown through August 18th. The opening reception will be held Friday, June 17th from 4:30-7pm.

 

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Al Honig

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Another solo show is on the horizon, featuring work by Al Honig.

He is a master of recycled assemblage, and has been working in this current vein for 35 years! In his experience, he has been a photographer, a sculptor of bronze, stone and wood, and a painter as well. He worked many years repairing printing presses and other machinery, refining the skill set required to make his pieces. He draws inspiration from metal sculptor David Smith, whose book also helped Al through a creative block. Al has influenced and worked with many local artists, including Dana Albany, Pepe Ozan, and Brian Goggin.

The majority of the pieces are from his series of Allegories, sculptures based on his observations and suppositions of human behavior and events. One of his favorite pieces, “Look Outs” is from that series, and will be part of what will be displayed for our show. All of his finished work is available to view online, at alhonig.com. Be sure to check out his videos while looking on his site.

Join us for Al Honig’s opening reception, Sunday April 24th from 4:30pm until 6:30 pm. You can also shop from the many wares of Building REsources at that time as well. Hope to see you there !

Re-Trospected Revisited! Closing Party April 10th

Just announced !

Closing PARTY For Dave Seabury’s solo show, “Re-Trospective” to be held Sunday, April 10th, 2016 at 4:30pm.            There will be refreshments and LIVE music by the Chuckleberries! Event is FREE.

There is currently a contest going on within the show, and the winners will be announced during the event. The contest revolves around the manikin sculpture, previously known as “Homeland Security”. Dave is asking contestants to “Title, and describe this piece”,  to write  “…the most pretentious, art speak laden title, and descriptive paragraph about this piece.” Interested persons then fill out a form with their title and description, and add it to the pot, entries are being sent to Dave and viewed now. “Extra Points” are rewarded  for citing “psych/social/political significance”.

The chosen entry will be announced during the event on Sunday, April 10th and will include the following options as a prize: 1) Dave will apply a painted design to a pair of VANS (or similar) tennies, or on a garment that you provide.

2) Choose 1 piece from a selection of original art by Dave. Painting, photograph, or small assemblage/sculpture.

3) Long term loan of the piece in question (provided it is displayed in a relatively public place)

Good Luck Everyone!!

 

Dave Seabury: Painter, Sculptor, Photographer, Musician

Music and art are the driving forces of my life. I paint and assemble my sculpture in much the same way that I write music: beginning with no set goal, I improvise and let the piece emerge. The inspiration for my art comes from musicians, artists, friends.

I began painting in the 1980’s, using discarded paint and canvases from the Berkeley Dump, where I worked as a salvager. Shortly thereafter, I began assembling sculptures. Like my painting, my sculptures use materials primarily gathered from the dump, local recycling centers, flea markets, garage sales, and just about anywhere things are left behind. I started welding in 2005.

I have received no formal instruction. Most of my “education” comes from reading art books and visiting museums and galleries. I consider my lack of formal training as an advantage. No one has been around to tell me, “You can’t do that” or “Its done this way.” My aim is to create visual stimulation that asks, “What the hell is going on here?”

I have been involved in the local Rock & Roll music scene since the mid ’70’s; performing with acts as Jonathan Richman and Little Roger & the Goosebumps, Dick Bright’s SRO, and Berkeley’s infamous Psychotic Pineapple. Currently I perform with Psychotic Pineapple, The Chuckleberries, The Rock & Roll Adventure Kids, The Pointing Wranglers, The RaveUps, The Feztones, The Presidiots, and numerous other musical aggregations.

I am a lifetime East Bay resident and work full time as the Waste Reduction Coordinator for the Presidio Trust in San Francisco.

Connect with me here:

234daves@gmail.com

…And on the Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/FBk-DaveSeabury-Art-Music

Mariana Nelson Biography

Mariana Nelson was born and raised in Newport Beach, California. She moved to San Francisco in her early 20’s and became involved in a thriving and inspired art community where she found her focus on reusing existing materials.

She began wrapping discarded materials found at reuse centers and also from the street. Using an age old Japanese wrapping technique called Temari, she soon developed a pattern that was unique to her alone. Anything from lint, dog hair and found plastic was wrapped with bright and colorful fiber, transforming trash into treasure.

As Mariana’s collection of small Temari grew, she began to find ways of assembling them together to create large pieces. Her current body of work involves using hundreds of wrapped forms to create one unified piece. Some of her work explores the idea of dark matter, while other compositions focus mostly on color and shape. She is also using a large collection of  plastic coffee cup lids, melting them into flower like sculptures.

MELT will open December 18th from 4:30-6:30pm and run thru February 12th.

Here is Mariana preparing her Temari piece featured in the S.C.R.A.P show.

mariana Nelson Bio

MELT

Warm up with our winter show, “MELT”; a solo show featuring recent works by Mariana Nelson. Opening Reception is next Friday, December 18th from 4:30-6:30 pm. There will be refreshments available and live music provided by the artist’s brother, Joe Robinson. Come join us and view the result of trash transformed into treasure.

melted coffee cup lid by Mariana Nelson

melted coffee cup lid by Mariana Nelson

CLINT: a one man show with Clint Imboden opens JULY 11th

CLINT

 

Last year’s SCRAP show first prize winner and reclaimed room artist of the past takes over the gallery with a unique sampling of his work.  Clint Imboden is a collector of all things.  He molds found objects into new structures that imbue them with life.  Always in conversation with his audience, Clint is a master of design on all scales.  This show invites you to take part in the art, with an interactive installation, and contemplate the bold shapes and containers of past lives and past times.

Join us July 11th for our first one man show with Clint Imboden.

Reception: 4:30pm

Food, drinks, fun and FREE!

701 Amador Street, SF 94124

DSC_0231

 

CARNAGE opens March 28th!

Carnage

The bold works of our featured artists recall animalistic themes, creating order from chaos and influences from the Southern Hemisphere.  The pieces all have textures, layers and commanding visuals that will excite and engage the viewer.  CARNAGE explores identity through various mediums, each artist presenting works that evoke a unique signature through leather burning, fork and spoon sculpture and assemblage.  Featuring the creations of artists Tanya Herrera, William Rhodes and Jemison Beshears.  Learn more about each of the artists below and join us Mar 28th to meet the makers!

 

 

CARNAGE is on display March 28-May21.

Opening Reception MAR 28 4:30-6:30pm, 701 Amador Street

TanyaHerreraHS

Tanya Herrera

It’s hard to write about your relationship to art when you’ve been making art since you can remember. It’s like trying to describe how you started walking, you just did at some point and have kept moving forward ever since. Both my parents were never drastically artistic, but I am the youngest of three siblings, and both my sister and brother were huge influences growing up. Everyone dabbles in art as a kid, but when I was about 8 my sister studied fine art at college in San Francisco and always came home with interesting projects and wonderful new tools and art supplies I never got to see in my art class in elementary school. My brothers illustrative and musical abilities further inspired me, I was considerably more enthralled after that. Where the three of us got the art bug, my parents never knew, but they supported our abilities and always were open to our goals.

I learned early on the hardships of being a fine artist, and surviving on the very little that you earn. As much as I loved making fine art, when thinking about my career as an adult, I decided to be creative in the design world as a graphic designer. I did this knowing in the future a design job would support my slowly blossoming fine art career. I went into college with the notion that I would one day return to my art and once I had become successful designer. I became an In-House designer in Portland Oregon, and made art and participated in shows for 5 years there before moving back to the bay area where I was born and raised.

My art consists of an accumulation of many different techniques I have learned over many years of experimentation and collaboration with fellow artists. I have also been influenced by the growing amount of waste going to landfills and the beauty one can find in objects that some would consider garbage. I try not constrain myself with materials, techniques or genres. Instead I open my mind to making art with what I am given and attempt to unlock the inner beauty that can be found in any object. Each piece is VERY unique and could probably never be duplicated, even if I wanted to try. Please enjoy my many years of hard work, and see there will be many more to come!

 

William Rhodes Headshot - Color

William Rhodes

I began my creative journey at the Baltimore School for the Arts.  I later earned a BA in Furniture Building and Design from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and a MFA from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth.

My creative works are in the collections of various galleries and museums and featured in several major publications. I strive to blend fine craft, sculpture and design with meaning and function. I explore themes of hidden knowledge, iconographic imagery and forms and how they can change meaning in a given cultural context. My art has been strongly influenced by my extensive travels, particularly to Africa, Asia, and Central and South America. The people, art and cultures of these societies have inspired me to consider non-Western approaches to art and sculpture. Explorations into the contrast between these traditional cultures and our modern one have also added depth to the narrative quality of my work. Additionally, recycled materials are an important component of my work as purposeful support for recycling. By reusing discarded materials I give objects new value and a second life.

williamrhodesart.com

 

JemisonBeshearsHS

Jemison Beshears

I have always enjoyed old things, the way they look, made to last, refined. Used with care and better looking when showing the scars of life. Found or discarded objects that performed some individual task in the past, now left to become a character ingredient in a visual poem…At beaches, at flea markets or antique stores…the things I have encountered on my road through life…Out the corner of the eye. An old toolbox, marbles, blocks of text, a glass mercury ball…at one time utilitarian, now chosen for its shape, color or patina. I try to marry formalism with bygone utility. Hopefully, being intimate without being sentimental.

 

Impressions of Bayview opens TODAY! Featured Artists: Keith Wilson and Mariana Nelson

Bayview

 

Opening Reception: January 17th, 4:30-6:30pm

FOOD, DRINKS, FREE

701 Amador Street, 94124, SF

 

Our last two featured artists, Keith Wilson and Mariana Nelson, compliment the black and white photography with otherworldly sculptures and painstaking Japanese temari work all created from recycled materials.

keith_wilson_headshot_300dpi_blackwhite

 

KEITH WILSON

Keith Wilson is a filmmaker and visual artist based in San Francisco. His film work has been exhibited at Sundance, the Berlinale, South by Southwest and the U.S. National Gallery of Art.

 

In addition to recent solo photography shows at the Martina Johnston Gallery in Berkeley and the SOFA Gallery in Austin, his artist book ALL THE BUILDINGS ON BURNET ROAD (2010) was exhibited at the Gagosian Gallery and the Brandhorst Museum as part of the exhibit Ed Ruscha & Co. His photography books HYDE PARK APARTMENTS (2011) and SEE I SAW (2015) were recently published by Publication Studio and he is the co-creator (with Shannon O’Malley) of the book GAY MEN DRAW VAGINAS (2014). In 2009, he began the ongoing interactive performance THE CAVE & MOUNTAIN TOUR, which was featured at the 2013 Fusebox Festival in Austin, Texas. In the Spring of 2015, his books, films and performances will be presented at the University of Georgia where he will be a Visiting Artist.

Keith received his MFA in film production from the University of Texas-Austin. He grew up on a cul-de-sac in suburban Atlanta but currently lives high atop Bernal Hill.
KeithWilson_Sculpture
MarianaNelsoHS

MARIANA NELSON

Mariana Nelson was born and raised in Southern California.  She grew up in Newport Beach and moved to San Francisco in her early 20′s.  In San Francisco she became involved in a thriving and inspired art community where she found her focus on reusing existing materials.

She began wrapping discarded materials she found at reuse centers or even from the street.  She used a thousand year old Japanese technique to wrap called Temari.  After years of wrapping and practice she soon developed a pattern and way to wrap that was unique to her.  Anything from lint and dog hair to found plastic and paper was wrapped with bright and colorful fiber, transforming literal trash into something completely unrecognizable.

As her collection of small colored Temari grew – she began to find ways of assembling them together to create large pieces.  Mariana’s current body of work involves using hundreds of wrapped forms to create one unified piece.  Some of her work explores the idea of dark matter – while other compositions focus mostly on color and shape.  She is just starting to work with plastic garbage.  Coffee lids and lids from fast food chains found on her walks with her dog.

dark_matter_main

Impressions of Bayview Featured Artist: Mitch Nelles

Mitch Nelles Headshot

Impressions of the Bayview

Opening Reception: January 17th 4:30pm-6:30pm

701 Amador Street

Food, Drinks, FREE

 

MITCH NELLES

Mitch Nelles was born in New York City in 1953 and grew up in New Jersey.  It was during his senior year at Rutgers College that he was first introduced to the “magic” of photography. Mitch had completed all of his required course work for his undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences and signed up for a photography course, which had a print portfolio for a final exam. This class gave him his first (and only) experience in the conventional darkroom.

Upon graduating from college, Mitch moved to Texas to pursue his Ph.D. in BioMedical Sciences and then to Massachusetts for his postdoctoral training.  He moved back to New Jersey in 1986 and focused his attention to his growing family and job as a research scientist in the medical diagnostics field.  Family and work during those years left little time for photography beyond documenting vacations and family events.  Yet, as he entered middle age, he became acutely aware of his need for a creative outlet.

Mitch was in his mid-forties when he made the decision to get back into photography.  Content at first to have his film sent out for printing at a local photo lab, he missed the artistic control he remembered from his darkroom experience in college.  Fortunately, during this period, digital image technology had become readily available and affordable for non-professionals. It became clear to Mitch that the digital darkroom was the way to go.  Film scanners, inkjet printers, Photoshop, and digital SLRs provided him with all the tools and control needed to produce high quality prints that met his creative and artistic expectations.

Following his move to Raleigh, North Carolina in 2001, Mitch joined the Capital City Camera Club where he met a group of like minded, supportive photographers who got together monthly to critique each other’s work and provide encouragement. He credits this small circle of friends with giving him the confidence in his photographic pursuits and helping him to see how different artists view the world photographically and express their individual creativity.

Mitch is self-trained and credits a wide variety of contemporary photographers for helping to shape his photographic vision and literacy. Chip Forelli, Roman Loranc, Chris Honeysett, Clyde Butcher, William Neill, and David Fokos have had a significant impact on his approach to photography.

Mitch works in the San Francisco bay area in the biotechnology field and lives in Half Moon Bay with his wife Janet. He has three daughters, Sara, Miriam, and Erica, who are the joys of his life. Now that he lives in California, he and Janet get a lot more visits from out of town family and friends.

Mitch’s work is available for purchase by contacting him at mitchnelles@gmail.com

 

One-Way-4739-X2

 

 

Impressions of the Bayview Featured Artist: Shantre Pinkney

 

 

 

 

 

 

Headshot_Shantre

Impressions of the Bayview

Opening Reception: January 17th 4:30pm-6:30pm

701 Amador Street

Food, Drinks, FREE

SHANTRE PINKNEY

Inspired by hip-hop, jazz and French New Wave cinema, Shantré Pinkney began her creative venture in New York and studied filmmaking in Atlanta, Los Angeles, and San Fran- cisco.

As a student at the Academy of Art

her first film, The French Artist won best super 8 at the Epidemic Film fes- tival presented at the San Francisco Castro Theater. Her short film The Raw was an official selection at the Pan African Film Festival, Western New York Black Film Festival, San Francisco Black Film Festival and also won awards at the Urban Media Makers festival.

Working within the mediums of photography, film, theater, and new media she is a lover of non-traditional and inquisitive stories. She creates stories to raise dialogue between art and her audience. She is currently developing an experimental film, Argos Amores and a feature script based on The Raw.

shantre.com @shantreverite

Artist Statement

Lest We Forget: A Portrait of Bayview Hunters Point Photography series by Shantré Pinkney

A black & white mobile photogra- phy exhibition bringing awareness to

individual stories, joys and struggles of San Francisco Bayview Hunters Point residents.

For years, Bayview Hunters Point

(BVHP) has been idealized as a high crime and high-polluted area of San Francisco. While working as a youth facilitator and developing my short thesis film, the apathy and violence residents faced in an increasingly gentrified community disheartened me. I’m not from this area, however, after living and working here for 5 years, and working with those living in lack, losing loved ones to violence, and dealing with unemployment left an impact on me. Lest We Forget came about through conversations I’ve had with residents and their love for the people in the neighborhood. Many have concerns with being gentrified and pushed out; including those who want to make sure that neighborhoods are safe, their jobs are steady and hous- ing affordable.

These photos are of friends, neighbors, friends of friends and beautiful strangers I met along the way in Bayview. I’m hoping to leave a last- ing and beautiful impression of those that represent the community – Their smiles, their laughter, their resilience and their humanness, which I think, sadly, many people forget.

Lest We Forget: Portrait of Bayview Hunters Point

Shantré Pinkney 2014

Embrace

 

Impressions of the BAYVIEW opens January 17th!

Bayview

 

Join us Saturday January 17th for our newest exhibit and a departure from our previous shows.  Impressions of the Bayview features Black and White photography at the center of the display complimented by abstract sculptures and unique temari works by artists: Mitch Nelles, Shantre Pinkney, Keith Wilson and Mariana Nelson.  There is a also a surprise interactive element where patrons can take part in the art making themselves!  Mitch presents a haunting view of our very own yard with photos of the Building Resources space through a lens that is nostalgic and reminiscent of past days.  Shantre shares her ongoing project, Less We Forget, a portfolio of faces from the Bayview community in the vain of remembrance and not leaving things to the past.  Keith reclaims old bathroom vanities and erects abstractly beautiful sculptures from them that seem almost other worldly, and Mariana shares her painstaking temari works, each piece crafted ball by ball and strung together to create a new vision, unusual and ephemeral.

 

 

 

Where: 701 Amador Street

When: January 17th, 4:30-6:30pm

What: Opening Reception with food, beer and wine.  Cost is FREE

Meet and mingle with the artists and enjoy the gallery and the Building Resources space from a whole new perspective.  We welcome you to our new show and a new year at Reclaimed Room and Building REsources.  JOIN US!

More information about the artists can be found at: https://reclaimedroom.com/opens-jan-17-mar14-impressions-of-the-bayview/

BR and Reclaimed Room Holiday Shin-dig THURSDAY!

It’s time for our holiday shin-dig RE-DO.  Please join us this Thursday for our first annual holiday party!  Celebrate the staff, patrons and artists that make up the BR and Re Room community!  The Worker’s Show is still in effect so this is also your last chance to pick up a unique last minute gift for a friend or for yourself.  This has been our highest grossing show to date!  Don’t miss out!

What: 1st Annual Holiday Party (food, drinks, fun)

Where: 701 Amador Street, SF 94124

When: Thursday, December 18th, 5-7pm

Why: Celebrate Community

Who: YOU and your friends

Cost: FREE

And, mark your calendars for the new year.  January 17th, we premiere our first photography based display with Shantre Pinkney’s Less We Forget, portraits of the Bayview community and Mitch Nelles with portraits of our favorite place in the Bayview-the Building REsources yard!  Framed by abstract sculptures from artist Keith Wilson and gorgeous Temari works by Mariana Nelson.

What:  Impressions of the Bayview Opening Reception (food drinks fun)

Where: 701 Amador Street, 94124

When: Saturday, January 17th, 4-6pm

Why: Meet the Artists, Revel in their work

Who: You and your friends

Cost: FREE

Worker’s Show kills it

Congratulations are in order for the staff artists at Building Resources.  As part of our Worker’s Show, staff from BR brought out their artistic endeavors for display.  All kinds of fabulous pieces came out of the woodwork as the opening night approached.  Unique furniture designs, gorgeous planters, photography, a chopper bicycle, bird houses, mosaics, sculptures and more.  And, since our gallery started in June of 2013, this has been our highest grossing show to date.  Wow!  Thanks to the community for coming out and supporting the staff artists here at Building REsources.  For those who haven’t made it in, you have one more chance to celebrate with our staff, artists, patrons and friends.

We are hosting our first ANNUAL Holiday Shin-dig.  Join us December 11th from 5-7pm to take in the glory of the workers show and mingle with the people who have made this place run from the ground up.  On display are works by Matthew, Angel, Remy, Dan, Micah, Jason, Archie, Sergio and MORE!  Join US!

HOLIDAY PARTY DECEMBER 11th!

REroomHolidayParty

Celebrate the season and the year with Building REsources and the Reclaimed Room.  Join us December 11th for our annual holiday party!  Eat, drink and be merry with Building REsources staff, patrons and Gallery artists.  Take in the Worker’s Show on display with unique art and furniture made exclusively by our staff!  Get some holiday shopping done while you are here.  We have had a great year here at BR and very exciting shows at the RE Room.  We want to share our good fortune with you all.  Please join US!

701 Amador Street

5-7pm

December 11th

FREE and fun for the whole family!

The WORKER’S Show opens OCT 25

WorkersSHOWFinal

Building REsources staff strut their stuff in this highly anticipated new exhibit at the Reclaimed Room.  See the artistic endeavors of the folks who man and woman the materials every day.  Jam packed with unique handmade furniture designs, landscape art, mosaics, bikes, and much much more!

SAT OCT 25: 4-6pm

FOOD, DRINKS, FREE!

701 Amador Street

Wine and Cheese Reception October 8th

Join the Reclaimed Room, artists Giuliana Pinto and Sam Russell for a closing reception of the show, Human Chimeras.  See their languid and lovely works  before they come down.  Gorgeous reclaimed headboards painted with dreamscapes and enigmatic painted figures on card tables and cabinet doors.  Both artists will be present to meet and mingle with you!

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Human Chimeras Opening Party Tomorrow!!

Celebrate the end of summer with our newest art opening at the Reclaimed Room!  Artists Giuliana Pinto and Sam Russell transform our space into dreams and explorations of the human mind and body.  Take it all in and meet the artists tomorrow from 4-6pm at our opening reception!

 

Sam Russell

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Sam’s background is in movement, spoken-word and painting.  Self-taught, Sam’s journey in painting over the past 25 years is a paradoxical story of an iconoclast embracing the icon.  The current series of paintings in Human Chimera track the abstraction of Sam’s classic “entity” figure:  this androgynous icon has repeated itself in countless variations over the years in Sam’s work, serving as a remedy for the existential dilemma of the godless.  Perhaps the iconoclast is finally ready to pull the icon apart, stay tuned.

 

Giuliana Pinto

Learn about Giuliana in the video below!

 

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Join us!

701 Amador Street

4-6pm

FOOD, DRINKS, FREE!!

humanchimeras

HUMAN CHIMERAS opens Aug 16th! SCRAP show closes this SATURDAY!

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JOIN US AUG 16th for our new show!

4-6pm

701 Amador Street

FREE!

 Sam Russell and Giuliana Pinto explore the depths and abstractions of the body and mind in this dreamy new show.

 

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SCRAP ART: Creative Reuse in the BAYVIEW closes this SATURDAY!

Head over to Public Glass for the send-off!

Closing Reception with hands-on creativityPublic Glass

Sat, July 26th 2-4pm

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Scenes from SCRAP Family DAY July 19th at RE Room

 

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BIG THANKS to all our partners for the SCRAP show!  It was a terrific collaboration and we will miss all the

eclectic work and fun times.  And sending lots of good vibes to SCRAP exhibit coordinator Jenny Morningstar

who will be leaving the Bay Area this August to go to graduate school on the East Coast!  Good Luck Jenny!

 

 

 

Fun times for the Fourth of July

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Wishing everyone a watermelon filled good time this holiday weekend!  Enjoy some good food and good times and hopefully some fireworks, too!  Stay safe and hydrated!

 

 

Long weekends are good for shopping at your favorite reuse center, Building REsources, too!  We will be here. Come on down and find a new project to dig your teeth into!

 

 

While you are here take a gander at our current exhibit: SCRAP ART Creative Reuse in the BAYVIEW on display until July 26th.  Learn more about our SCRAP-our other favorite reuse center by checking out the video below!

 

 

And, join us JULY 19th from 2-4pm for a SCRAP party with artist demos!