Re-Visions

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For the show Re-Visions, San Francisco based artists Danielle Satinover and Gregory Vernitsky bring a school of creative thought together. Both artists take a similar approach to the idea of found materials and come from a background where the financial ability to source materials for work was very limited. Vernitsky, originally from the Soviet Union with limited resources to artist materials, and Satinover by a lifetime restricted by socio-economic circumstances, have instilled in them the skills to see something in the ordinary and often discarded. Both artists have been able to see beyond the ordinary to discover new interpretations.

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Tall Bird, by Gregory Vernitsky

Vernitsky combines carved and painted found wood, tossed metal, and plastic into a joyful play with time, scale, and narrative. Concepts and structures of public art, relativity of meaning, and reflection on human frailty and feelings, are realized through his innate ability to see possibilities in things as simple as a block of wood, or grace in a rusty scrap of metal.

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Rattlesnake, by Danielle Satinover

Satinover also plays with concepts of the human condition but focuses more on the connection between humans and our environments and structures.  She often takes discarded man made items to create abstract forms. Her current work has been more descriptive, but still plays with the tensions between man’s creations and natures.

Both Vernitsky and Satinover often approach their subject matter with a sense of lightheartedness. This ease with which they come to their subject matter does not take away from the significance of the work, but rather adds a dimension to the story telling and gives the viewer a place to reflect on the history of the object as well as the new vision given to it by the artists. In the end, these two artists take discarded material and use it to bring us back to ourselves and reflect on our humanity and our connections to our surroundings and each other.

Join them in celebrating this journey at the opening reception Friday, July 12th from 5-7pm. For a more in-depth exploration of the artists’ processes, an artist talk will be held Saturday, July 27th from 1-3pm. Try your own hand at their process with an art making session August 10th from 1-3pm; finally, Re-Visions will end with a closing reception Saturday, September 7th from 1-3pm.

 

FULL CIRCLE

Nothing to Lose, by Dianne Hoffman

FULL CIRCLE, a duo exhibition by Dianne Hoffman & Su Evers May 7th – July 5th, 2019, opening reception to be held Saturday, May 11th from 5 – 7pm. Artist Talk and ArtSpan Mixer: Thursday, May 30th 6-8pm.

 

San Francisco artists Dianne Hoffman and Su Evers explore through mixed media the ebbs and flows of an evolving relationship. Using found objects, reclaimed wood and manipulated photography, they collectively take the viewer on a symbolic, personal journey from admiration to crush, passion to collaboration, trials to resolution, heartbreak to healing and then back around to an unwavering alliance of friendship.

Chemistry, by Dianne Hoffman

Dianne Hoffman creates dimensional vignettes of allegories by linking organic objects with industrial and figurative remnants and combines complementary muted color schemes to harmonize dissimilar media. She was born and raised in the suburbs of Southern California and moved north to become a resident of San Francisco in 1988. The City by the Bay, with its loving embrace of everything extraordinary and endless resource of possibilities, came to cultivate and nurture her creative impulses. She has been a full time assemblage artist of salvaged and repurposed components since 2010 with work found in collections worldwide.

 

Kind Woman, by Su Evers

 

Su Evers is drawn to the worn and deteriorating  elements of weathered wood, rusty nails, found objects and trampled on paper discovered on the streets of San Francisco. For this series she has assembled photographic digital frescos and printed photographs combined with found elements to capture a poetic depth of nostalgic fluidity. Su has lived and worked in San Francisco for the past thirty years and is currently creating art in a barn in Woodside.

FULL CIRCLE will open with its reception Saturday May 11th , complete with light refreshments. The event is free, please join us for this great show! Once open, the gallery is open for viewing and purchase everyday, from 9am -4:30pm. There will also be an artist talk and ArtSpan Mixer on Thursday, May 30th from 6-8pm.

DisposABILITIES

DisposABILITIES is a group show with Denise Laws, Heather Law, Marianne Mitten, Mariana Nelson, and Kevin Tuszynski, all using repurposed materials destined to be disposed. They are all inspired to rescue and manipulate materials that are predestined for landfill. They seek and acquire these materials and are driven by their limitless possibilities.

Denise uses single use foil lined packaging like tetra-Pak and food/beverage packaging. Kevin and Marianne work with paper scraps. Mariana works with plastic bags of all sorts. Heather works with Press Mold and Slip-cast trash.

This show begins on March 7th with its opening reception from 5 – 7 pm and runs through May 3rd, 2019.

Maze, by Denise Laws

Denise Laws

Through various arrangements and repetitions, the organic forms, shapes, and patterns of “Mylar Reveries” reveal the hidden elegance of reclaimed debris used as a medium, in large as a much-needed reminder of environmental awareness. The ultimate goal of this on-going body of work is to divert the refuse, such as single-use foil lined packagings from landfill and recast into graceful topographies that echo and reflect nature, landscapes, and horizons.

 

unnamed, by Heather Law

Heather Law

Heather Law’s artwork is a dramatic depiction of American material consumerism and the resulting waste it creates. The repurposing of personal detritus makes an ethical claim on the viewer, an invitation to reflect upon one’s own daily interactions with these common objects. The transformation of trash into slip-cast ceramic sculpture emphasizes the permanency of our growing landfills in an ever-increasing disposable nation.

 

Polyglot, by Marianne Mitten

Marianne Mitten

After working on computers and websites as a graphic designer for years, Marianne really missed working with her hands. Creating art with recycled paper strips became a natural transition. There is a lot of waste when it comes to printing: make ready sheets, trimmings, folding, gluing, etc. so instead of buying paper, why not create art with this instead. Marianne never has a preconceived idea when it comes to making pieces. She allows the medium to drive the piece.

 

Fungus, by Mariana Nelson

Mariana Nelson

Mariana’s work captures material like spools of thread, plastic biohazard bags and thousands of coffee cup lids, and turns them into meaningful, thought-provoking art. First is the degree of transformation: processing and inducing techniques – turning “garbage” into art. Mariana has an even greater purpose for these objects once they are transformed. Warped plastic lids are altered to the point that, together, their petal-like forms read like beautiful, vibrant fungus, perched on trees.

 

Tranquil Whirl, by Kevin Tuszynski

Kevin Tuszynski

“Chaos/Crisis” are works made during a dark period in Kevin’s life. However, the works are not dark at all. The use of clashing  colors and mixed patterns are used to portray the disruption of his life at that time. “Road Trip” series was inspired by finding a box of road maps in a neighbor’s recycling bin. The soft greens and blues in the maps play with the bolder colors he already works with. Kevin also works with other scavenged paper, print trimmings and fabrics.

 

Beauty on the Periphery

We don’t even see most of the stuff that’s thrown away – its on the periphery of our vision. All four of us picked up discarded items and gave them intention again. These items once had a purpose. We are now revitalizing them into forms that can be aesthetically appreciated. We hope that our intention will make an impression on viewers and help them see ways to consider and appreciate the potential of everyday throwaway bits and pieces.

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Emily Cruz

Emily Cruz is an artist born and raised in Escondido, California but moved to the Bay Area in 2009 to pursue her degree in art at San Francisco State University. While she dabbles in sculptured fiber, you can find her perusing printmaking, photography and life.

 

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Dierdre Weinberg

Dierdre Weinberg is a painter and muralist in San Francisco and uses recycled canvases to paint on. For this show, she scraped the bottom of paint cans and palletes  and attached them to used canvases, showing the colorful and and interesting patterns that the paint itself creates. The material is not seen at all, much less as a possible artistic venture, which is what she likes – to see the overlooked or unseen and it in a new way.

 

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Andrea Allen

The insect invasion series combines technology, biology, and geography to stimulate an aerial view of the earth. The digital laser discs represent the ocean while the land is grid-like and abstract. This series reminds us of Pangea, how approximately 300 million years ago all land was one super continent. Maybe we need to be reminded that we all are one, and that everything was/is connected. Each piece is an island, similar yet different. The scale of the insects are much too large and invasive in comparison to their surroundings. Their wings are made from the internal programming of keyboards, both delicate and detailed. This body of work came about as a playful exploration inspired by Sci-Fi “B” movies. Technology has made insects mega powerful. We have underestimated them. Insects have bee on this planet way longer than we have and are taking it back!

My process begins with an object that intrigues me. I reconceptualize the intended purpose of that object by transforming it into another. Much could be said by the discovery of self by researching the materials we surround ourselves with. Growing up in the United States with its abundance of materials and tendencies toward wastefulness has influenced my fascination with being resourceful. Art is a part of my whole being, my raison d’être. Playful and conceptual sculptures take life.

I received my degree in Fiber Art and Combined Media Sculpture from the University of Arizona, which set the foundation for learning the importance evolving relationships. Like a tapestry, everything is connected to everything else. Patterns in nature, humanity, and technology inspire me. Color, line, form, and texture are prominent design elements in my creations. My bold and colorful sculptures incorporate many different materials and processes in order to get my ideas across.

 

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Sophie Lee

Sophie Lee uses packaging and plastic and weaves them with the idea of using them as a canvas but they become works within themselves.

 

This show opens Friday, January 11th 2019 with an opening reception from 5-7pm and will be on view thru March 1st 2019.

 

Collage & FUSE, the art of Asher and Muse

 

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Opening November 23rd, 2018, The Reclaimed Room Gallery presents Collage & FUSE, the art of Asher and Muse. It features the works of two Bayview based artists, Lani Asher and Jes Muse. Together, they bring the hard and soft in the juxtaposition of mediums. From paper to metal and vinyl to glass, Asher and Muse find whatever materials they can use and reuse to create two and three-dimensional works of art. The Opening Reception will be Thursday, November 29th from 5-7pm. This exhibit will be on view daily through January 4th with the exception of December 25th and New Year’s Day.

Lani Asher

Untitled, by Lani Asher

Lani Asher lives and works in San Francisco. She maintains a studio in a San Francisco industrial park alongside motorcycle and classic car repair shops and Chinese food wholesalers. Born in Los Angeles, Lani Asher attended the University of California Santa Barbara where she studied with Charles Garabedian, John McCracken, and James Turrel at the College of Creative Studies. Afterwards she moved to New York City and taught art, worked at an erotic bakery, and attended film classes at NYU and Columbia. She spent a year studying video, photography, book making, and film at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, New York. After living in Madrid, Spain, she landed at the San Francisco Art   Institute in the New Genres Department for graduate school. During her independent study project in Brazil she created a video examining the relationship of Brazilian Baroque art and architecture to the beauty of imperfect pearls, and transgendered Brazilian sex symbol Roberta Close. Over the years she has taught art for numerous Bay Area non profits, including teaching art to prisoners, elders, artists with disabilities, and is an online arts writer. Find her online thru laniasherart.com .

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City, by Jes Muse

Jes Muse, a resident of the Bayview here in San Francisco, is a native New Yorker with BFA from the State University of New York at Purchase. Jes is a third generation artist following in the footsteps of her grandmother, Jean Cobean, and her mother, Lisa Muse. Having found a balance between the aspects of the mid-century modern shapes and forms of Jean’s sculptural stone work and the figurative forms of Lisa’s two-dimensional works, Jes creates work ranging from mid-century inspired, brutalist works to figurative three-dimensional constructions. Jes enjoys reclaiming industrial refuse like railroad spikes, horseshoes, horseshoe nails and live-edge wood from the forest floors and northern California rivers. Jes’s incorporation of railroad spikes is a tribute to her father’s work as a Track Supervisor for the commuter railroad in New York.

The main body of Jes’s work is in steel and glass. Having different cooling and heating points, steel and glass are not the most compatible mediums. The glass becomes marred by the sparks created in the act of welding and if heated too much will crack and split apart, so it is a challenge to secure the glass well enough without overheating it. Jes dabbles in many mediums and was recently inspired by the work of Bay Area duo, t.w. five, to create pieces with adhesive vinyl, in fact, you may have seen her cruising around in the Mondrian Volvo Recently.

 

REFLECTIONS: the art of Marilynn Pardee and Marlene Aron

One imagines “traveling at the speed of light”…the other travels slowly, monitoring each breath. Marilynn Pardee works with industrial materials, Marlene Aron builds from the natural world. What holds the work of these two artists together is their love for detail, exploration, discovery, and construction of their seemingly disparate works. Marilynn works with iron, auto parts, tire prints. While Marlene uses flowers, leaves, soil, wood ash, paint and glacial rocks, layered onto canvas and wood. Theirs is a world of contrasts, and yet they sit beautifully together.

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Diana, by Marilynn Pardee

Marilynn Pardee creates lamps, furniture, screens and clothing, often painted and printed with tire tracks from cars, trucks and bicycles. “Motion is the essential element of my work. The series is titled ‘Light in Translation’. I imagine traveling at the speed of light, leaving random colorful tracks. Each piece is created with scavenged and recycled materials, assembled and welded with my trusted assistant Miguel Ayala. Anchoring the show will be five beacons varying 6 to 8 feet tall, entitled Hope, Joy, Inspiration, Peace and Mirth.” Marilynn Pardee’s reflections are inspired from her early work, “reimagined and illuminated”.

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Breathing Mound: Rite of Passage, by Marlene Aron

Marlene Aron’s work – her installations, as well as her mounted wall pieces – is a meticulous layering of memory and time. A reflection from her childhood, observing the colors of earth beneath her feet, the glistening light between branches, the sounds of water in brooks and streams. Marlene layers soil, mulch, cocoa bean hulls, crushed oak galls, wood ash, melted beeswax, oil, alkyd and acrylic paint onto canvas and wood. Her environmental sculpture installations consist of glacial, garden and lava rocks, soil, oak galls, pit-fired shards of pottery, and leaves. “I move with my body and hands that which means the most to me. I move the earth combined with water, light and air. With breath, twigs, stones, broken shards of pottery, to find myself again. My work is about the building up of layers and stripping away of surface; it is about reaching for the center.”

 

Art on the card:

Marilynn Pardee: The lamp on the card is titled “Hermes,” the Greek messenger of the gods.

Marlene Aron: detail, “Searching for Meaning in the Forest of Plenty”. Mixed media, natural material and paint on canvas.

This exhibition begins Friday, September 21st with an Opening Reception featuring live music from Wishing & Bone. It will be on view through November 16th 2018.

 

 

re – imagine

Aiko Cuneo with a cut up milk carton

re – imagine is the combined works of Aiko Cuneo, Kathryn Hyde and Monica Lee. Known for their involvement with SCRAP here in San Francisco, these three artists invite you to re – imagine common everyday items in a new light, and with an artistic purpose in mind. Some of these items used in the show include: discarded books, paint chips, milk cartons, junk mail, coffee sleeves and postage stamps. This exhibition opens Friday, July 20th with a public reception from 5-7pm and can be viewed through September 15th 2018.

 

Waking Up Happy, by Aiko Cuneo

From A family of makers, Aiko Cuneo worked with teachers, students and families as a teaching artist in San Francisco schools. She combines a variety of materials to make two and three-dimensional constructions. SCRAP, the Scrounger’s Center for Reusable Art Parts, has been an ongoing source of materials that inspire Cuneo’s work. Her work for this show is made with paper, security envelopes, bar codes, buttons, sewing notions, milk cartons, 45 rpm records and paint swatches. “The art of making something from someone else’s discards is food for my soul as it brings joy and satisfaction from the challenges of transformation.”

 

Remains, by Kathryn Hyde

Kathryn Hyde‘s artistic endeavors include sculpture, printmaking, collage and photography. Hyde’s investigation of architecture and design is found in the elemental details in her sculpture, etchings, and photography. Her creative spirit was influenced by her mother’s interest in architecture and ceramics.

Most recently, she is constructing sculpture incorporating reclaimed cardboard and decaying materials. The sequence is created from common, everyday materials including withered wood, discarded cardboard and rusted metal work. Hyde scavenges from city streets, generous building contractors and reuse yards. She carefully pieces the object together, rather like completing a puzzle.

Hyde’s work is based on her concern for the natural environment and losses from natural disasters, especially the recent fires in California. These sculptures depict her affinity for the land, and her desire to preserve earth’s precious materials and natural resources. Her hope for the future is sustained by the dedicated individuals and organizations working creatively to protect the air, water and soil.

Hyde’s work is exhibited in San Francisco at the Thoreau Center for Sustainability and the SF Department for the Environment.

 

 

Untitled, by Monica Lee

After 30 years as a freelance film photographer in San Francisco, Monica Lee has returned to her first love of making things out of reclaimed and found materials sometimes using discarded books, inner tubes, bottle caps, postage stamps, found paper and fabric in her artwork. Her childhood was spent watching her dad making and building things large as the family home to small pieces of folk art using primarily reclaimed materials. At a young age she wanted to build and make things just like her dad and they collaborated on many projects from childhood to adulthood! Her dad Philip was her biggest supporter and inspiration in her artwork until his passing at age 97. Monica dedicates her artwork for this show to her beloved dad.

Monica lives in San Francisco with her husband Jonathan Rapp and their children Elana and Samuel. Monica teaches creative reuse workshops at Ruth’s Table, S.C.R.A.P., The San Francisco Campus for Jewish Living, FabMo and the San Francisco Center for the book. Monica blogs occasionally at http://www.artfulrecrafter.com .