REFLECTIONS: the art of Marilynn Pardee and Marlene Aron

One imagines “traveling at the speed of light”…the other travels slowly, monitoring each breath. Marilynn Pardee works with industrial materials, Marlene Aron builds from the natural world. What holds the work of these two artists together is their love for detail, exploration, discovery, and construction of their seemingly disparate works. Marilynn works with iron, auto parts, tire prints. While Marlene uses flowers, leaves, soil, wood ash, paint and glacial rocks, layered onto canvas and wood. Theirs is a world of contrasts, and yet they sit beautifully together.

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Diana, by Marilynn Pardee

Marilynn Pardee creates lamps, furniture, screens and clothing, often painted and printed with tire tracks from cars, trucks and bicycles. “Motion is the essential element of my work. The series is titled ‘Light in Translation’. I imagine traveling at the speed of light, leaving random colorful tracks. Each piece is created with scavenged and recycled materials, assembled and welded with my trusted assistant Miguel Ayala. Anchoring the show will be five beacons varying 6 to 8 feet tall, entitled Hope, Joy, Inspiration, Peace and Mirth.” Marilynn Pardee’s reflections are inspired from her early work, “reimagined and illuminated”.

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Breathing Mound: Rite of Passage, by Marlene Aron

Marlene Aron’s work – her installations, as well as her mounted wall pieces – is a meticulous layering of memory and time. A reflection from her childhood, observing the colors of earth beneath her feet, the glistening light between branches, the sounds of water in brooks and streams. Marlene layers soil, mulch, cocoa bean hulls, crushed oak galls, wood ash, melted beeswax, oil, alkyd and acrylic paint onto canvas and wood. Her environmental sculpture installations consist of glacial, garden and lava rocks, soil, oak galls, pit-fired shards of pottery, and leaves. “I move with my body and hands that which means the most to me. I move the earth combined with water, light and air. With breath, twigs, stones, broken shards of pottery, to find myself again. My work is about the building up of layers and stripping away of surface; it is about reaching for the center.”

 

Art on the card:

Marilynn Pardee: The lamp on the card is titled “Hermes,” the Greek messenger of the gods.

Marlene Aron: detail, “Searching for Meaning in the Forest of Plenty”. Mixed media, natural material and paint on canvas.

This exhibition begins Friday, September 21st with an Opening Reception featuring live music from Wishing & Bone. It will be on view through November 16th 2018.

 

 

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Aiko Cuneo with a cut up milk carton

re – imagine is the combined works of Aiko Cuneo, Kathryn Hyde and Monica Lee. Known for their involvement with SCRAP here in San Francisco, these three artists invite you to re – imagine common everyday items in a new light, and with an artistic purpose in mind. Some of these items used in the show include: discarded books, paint chips, milk cartons, junk mail, coffee sleeves and postage stamps. This exhibition opens Friday, July 20th with a public reception from 5-7pm and can be viewed through September 15th 2018.

 

Waking Up Happy, by Aiko Cuneo

From A family of makers, Aiko Cuneo worked with teachers, students and families as a teaching artist in San Francisco schools. She combines a variety of materials to make two and three-dimensional constructions. SCRAP, the Scrounger’s Center for Reusable Art Parts, has been an ongoing source of materials that inspire Cuneo’s work. Her work for this show is made with paper, security envelopes, bar codes, buttons, sewing notions, milk cartons, 45 rpm records and paint swatches. “The art of making something from someone else’s discards is food for my soul as it brings joy and satisfaction from the challenges of transformation.”

 

Remains, by Kathryn Hyde

Kathryn Hyde‘s artistic endeavors include sculpture, printmaking, collage and photography. Hyde’s investigation of architecture and design is found in the elemental details in her sculpture, etchings, and photography. Her creative spirit was influenced by her mother’s interest in architecture and ceramics.

Most recently, she is constructing sculpture incorporating reclaimed cardboard and decaying materials. The sequence is created from common, everyday materials including withered wood, discarded cardboard and rusted metal work. Hyde scavenges from city streets, generous building contractors and reuse yards. She carefully pieces the object together, rather like completing a puzzle.

Hyde’s work is based on her concern for the natural environment and losses from natural disasters, especially the recent fires in California. These sculptures depict her affinity for the land, and her desire to preserve earth’s precious materials and natural resources. Her hope for the future is sustained by the dedicated individuals and organizations working creatively to protect the air, water and soil.

Hyde’s work is exhibited in San Francisco at the Thoreau Center for Sustainability and the SF Department for the Environment.

 

 

Untitled, by Monica Lee

After 30 years as a freelance film photographer in San Francisco, Monica Lee has returned to her first love of making things out of reclaimed and found materials sometimes using discarded books, inner tubes, bottle caps, postage stamps, found paper and fabric in her artwork. Her childhood was spent watching her dad making and building things large as the family home to small pieces of folk art using primarily reclaimed materials. At a young age she wanted to build and make things just like her dad and they collaborated on many projects from childhood to adulthood! Her dad Philip was her biggest supporter and inspiration in her artwork until his passing at age 97. Monica dedicates her artwork for this show to her beloved dad.

Monica lives in San Francisco with her husband Jonathan Rapp and their children Elana and Samuel. Monica teaches creative reuse workshops at Ruth’s Table, S.C.R.A.P., The San Francisco Campus for Jewish Living, FabMo and the San Francisco Center for the book. Monica blogs occasionally at http://www.artfulrecrafter.com .

 

 

 

Crossover – 2 Artists, 6 degrees of Separation

CrossOver – 2 Artists, 6 degrees of Separation is a collaboration between Reddy Lieb and Jennifer Ewing. Each artist has cross-pollinated each other’s approach to express the ways we all are connected. Their art is designed around a continuum of lines that are the underlying energies that hold all things together in a common space.

Through their exploration of painting, sculpture, and mixed media pieces, all created and inspired by recycled materials (mirrors, paper, plastic and string)they are crossing over any boundaries of separation to express the greater whole.

The artists have collaborated recently on Currents, a 2015 exhibition at the China Brotsky  Gallery in the SF Presidio using repurposed materials to inspire their work. They meet regularly to critique their work and share new concepts for exploration. Both artists are passionate about reusing found materials in their art and in their concerns for the health of the planet.

Reddy Lieb has created a wall of paintings and mixed media pieces that includes both abstract and realistic imagery, old and new, opposite forces that coalesce into a whole. Everything is connected…even seemingly random and unrelated materials, or concerns.

Jennifer Ewing continues her work with the symbol of the Spirit Boat as a metaphor for passage. In this exhibit she has created a large ship that pulls along a trail of plastic debris that references our tragic and growing Sea of Plastic. Her smaller sculptures are inspired by Christo’s technique of wrapping subjects and are made using light fixtures that become mysterious yet familiar feeling objects.

 

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Reddy Lieb

“Art is a form of nourishment (of consciousness, the spirit), ” – Susan Sontag

This is how I describe my passion for art and the ideas that I explore through mixed media. Artists have transformed found materials into “art” for as long as there have been artists. I have been using recycled materials in my work for over 35 years. In 2000, I was awarded an artists residency at Recology, where I put together a portfolio of work based on my exploration of the mythical character Demeter, and her dilemma in the 20th century. After completing this residency, in 2002, I went back to graduate school at CCAC, when I experienced the collapse of American idealism after 9/11. Working with broken glass, burnt wood and grown grass I built installations. My final installation was creating a glass tower of cards that referenced the myth of King Minos and the collapse of the kingdom on the isle of Crete.

Sites of transformation have always interested me. They are mysterious spaces, a fertile void, ripe for renewal. I created work based on demolition sites and the Phoenix rising.

Now, in the midst of major social, political and economic upheaval, I am exploring the illusion of security.  What we need in this time is to know how we are all connected, like mycelium of mushrooms that forms an immense underground communication network. Referencing sacred geometry and ideas from the string theory I am creating connections.

“The artist vocation is to send light into the human heart.”  – George Sand

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Jennifer Ewing

A life long artist, Jennifer has worked as a teaching artist, an illustrator, muralist, entrepreneur and workshop facilitator.

Her major theme of “Spirit Boats” began in 2005 as a response to the death of her father and is dedicated in his honor. Her boats become symbols of transformation that are created as sculpture, paintings, drawings, prints and installations that reference one’s movement through life.

In her personal work and workshops, Jennifer uses recycled materials with an emphasis on plastic and paper. She is inspired by the universality of Spirit Boats and demonstrates how little boats can be made of cut-apart plastic water bottles or stained papers. She is also influenced by how the artist, Christo, has wrapped objects that has given her new ideas on how to treat recycled lights that have become sculptures.

Jennifer has lived and worked in an historic SF Mission District artist community, Developing Artists, since 1986. She has exhibited her work widely in various Bay Area venues over the past twenty years with solo shows including: Kimball Gallery, deYoung Museum, Living Shaman Museum of the SF Presidio, Gallery 190, UCSF Memory & Aging Center, and Ruth’s Table. She is a senior teaching artist at the SF Fine Arts Museum and a museum educator at the Contemporary Jewish Museum where she works with adult and children’s programs, designs projects and leads tours of exhibitions.

Since 1989 she has ran her mural business, Ewing and Germano, with husband, Leo Germano that specializes in fine arts services for commercial and residential clients.

In 2012, she launched two additional businesses for organizational learning: How to Navigate Change for Team Building and Making Your Mark Now, offering drawing programs in partnership with Leo Germano. As an artist and entrepreneur, she is a bridge to help people incorporate art and right brain thinking into their daily lives.

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This exhibition is on view through the 13th of July, 2018.

WHAT IF?

Opening March 16th, 2018 The Reclaimed Room is excited to present WHAT IF? a group exhibition featuring the puzzling creations of three Bay Area artists whose process-based work draw attention to societal chaos and conflict. WHAT IF? artists Clint Imboden, James Shefik and Jamie Banes provoke viewers to question the reality and truths of the structures displayed before them. Although recognized for their use of everyday materials in unexpected and unusual ways, these artists’ sculptures and installations also stimulate and challenge their audiences’ preconceptions of material, purpose, and intent. This exhibition will be on view through May 11th 2018.

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Crutches, by Clint Imboden

“I come to making art with the perspective of a therapist. Just as a good therapist can act as a catalyst for change in a client, good art should elicit a strong reaction from the audience, provoking them to explore the reasons why they’ve been affected.”

“I find my materials at local flea markets and estate sales. I start with the artifacts of daily living, things that most people overlook: battered globes, worn shoes, and dilapidated tools. I’m drawn to old materials because they foster purposeful imperfection in my art, an attribute that’s connected to their previous lives. I use them for their connotative, associative or narrative possibilities. My installation work is tactile and handmade; as an artist, I focus on process and on topical, issue-based content.”

“Viewing my artwork is not meant to be a passive experience; it involves reading, deciphering, taking the initiative to engage physically and psychically with text and objects. I use materials that challenge my audience to consider multiple references in order to understand the full meaning of a piece. I want people to be caught up in the experience of my work, just as I am, in making it. My goal is to have them come away from an encounter with the work knowing something new about themselves.”

 

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Insomnia, by James Shefik

Conceptual, multidisciplinary artist James Shefik lives in Oakland. Along with making art in his studio, he is a scenic artist and scenic foreman on movie and television sets (Sense8, Thirteen Reasons Why, Steve Jobs, Big Eyes, Chasing Mavericks, and Milk, to name a few).

Primarily a sculptor, Shefik creates artwork that reveals his strong concern for the environment, for the government’s tyranny of purposeful invasion of our privacy, and social political absurdity that often accompanies concentrations of power.

His latest work employs photographic prints to mutate small transient into an almost theatrical experience. His work has been exhibited at the Aqua Art Fair in Miami, the Richmond Art Center in Richmond, CA, Sanchez Art Center in Pacifica, CA, and Autobody Fine Art in Alameda, CA. Shefik was a recipient of a SF Weekly Mastermind Grant in 2011.

 

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Nominative Determinant, by Jamie Banes

“Growing up in a blue-collar construction family, I connected with tools and materials at an early age. Exposure to the job site as a youth helped shape my interest in architecture and the ever-changing organism of the built environment. These early experiences continue to inform my work and contribute to my own sense of place and identity.”

“The built environment serves as a multilayered record of human activity, mirroring the effects of society’s needs and motives over time. The concept of structures as living entities is a natural starting point for my experiments, often stemming from themes of origin and decay within the urban landscape. The breakneck speed at which this life cycle revolves in the Bay Area underscores the socioeconomic and political issues of our time and further influences my work.”

“My process results in quirky assemblages reminiscent of childhood forts or tree house constructions in miniature. My most current work presents as a collection of eccentric architectural models and maps, wryly alluding to the seriousness of many ominous societal issues on our collective horizon. The materials I collect are typically found, bartered or bargained for in keeping with my inclination to reuse when possible.”

 

 

 

 

CONFIGURATIONS: Three Artists Assemble Themselves

This upcoming show, opening Friday January 12th 2018, will feature puppets, sculpture, jewelry and furniture, all deeply crafted from 100% salvaged material. The three artists, Francesca Borgatta, Charles Foss, and Miles Epstein, each bring work with personality, humor, and a recognition that a long studio practice will always reveal new surprises. Especially when the work is assembled in a new context and new configurations.

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Blue Monkey, by Francesca Borgotta

Francesca Borgotta has been building puppets since the 1970’s, having been apprenticed with Bread and Puppet Theater in New York.  Since then, she has lived a full life of dance, drama and puppetry.  She comes to the Reclaimed Room from the East Bay, where she works at the East Bay Depot for Creative Reuse.

“To make my artwork, I look for recycled materials. I bind random things together, say a crab’s shell and an insect husk. Then I add new things until they appear as a single configuration, a form which needs completion. I like puppets because each one has a name and a story, and is meant to be manipulated.”

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Wooden Tablet, by Francesca Borgata

“At the Reclaimed Room, I will present each puppet with bits of dialogue to indicate the story. The wall hangings include a set of tablets describing these five elements: wood, fire, earth, metal and water. I started these in 2015 when I was studying Chinese traditional medicine where each element is assigned a color, a season, an emotion, and other qualities. To understand this interaction, I gathered objects in that material and arranged them on a plywood panel.”

“I am very happy to be showing my work in the Reclaimed Room. This wide open space celebrates both the aesthetic beauty and practical value of recycled materials. Artists are encouraged to work together to plan their show, and explore possibilities for collaboration, to generate a much-needed sense of community. Hopefully, through our artwork, we can encourage a sense of ecological awareness.”  fborgotta@puppetfigures.com

 

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Crystalline Spheres, by Charles Foss, aka c.H.u.K.

Charles Foss, also known as c.H.u.K, brings to the gallery work from his “Landfill Interception Project”, specifically his “Fauna” series. From his website freektures.com: “..an exploration of inanimate evolutionary improbabilities, using common everyday items which have been deemed useless, cast aside, and abandoned.” Originally from Maine, Charles has been a toy maker, prop fabricator, performance artist, part of a circus crew, a magicians assistant and a scary clown pie maker (among other things!) Currently he is creating “Funky Found Flora” and “Decolletorations ~ talismans created with magical parts and pieces we step on every day.”

 

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Miles Epstein

 

Miles Epstein uses salvage materials and simple tooling to design and build art and other useful objects. His work ranges from furniture, sculpture and installation and uses paper, metal, cork and concrete. By allowing the qualities of his materials to drive many design decisions, Miles’ work is sometimes unpredictable and often quirky. The work is often very labor intensive but strives to appear natural, even relaxed.

For this show he says: “I’m revisiting the west-facing windows in the gallery, working with two new materials for me: clear acrylic sheets and colored, tumbled glass. By gluing the glass to the sheets with two-part epoxy I hope to create a hybrid visual experience, combining elements of graphic design, stained glass and painting. The process is exacting and fussy but has great potential for beauty. I am also bringing to the floor of the gallery a new collection of cafe style tables built primarily from cardboard and cork. The cardboard comes from salvaged bicycle boxes, and the cork is a mixture of reused  rolled cork sheeting and recycled wine corks. These materials are very familiar to me and I’ve been using them in furniture work for over 12 years. But they still amaze me with their resilience, strength-to-weight ratio, and their subtle color palette.

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Cork Cafe Tables, by Miles Epstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

for the LOVE of ART

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This is a group show honoring the tradition of gathering around the table among friends and socially producing art for pleasure. It will feature multiple mosaic artists, metal sculptures, craft jewelry, knitted critters, crochet, cast paper, glass tableware and original lighting designs, all sourced from reused materials. We open this show on November 17th from 5-7pm and it will run through January 5th 2018.

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Dana Albany

“From the very grandest scale to the very minute, my artwork is a medley of recycled and discarded materials. I enjoy working alone, as well as collaborating amongst many! Gathering together with fellow artists has been a meeting ground of genuine support and swirling creativity. It has taken me out of my darkest moments, inspired me, and brought depth to my art, that left alone would not have arisen.”

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Haideen Anderson

Haideen Anderson works with a variety of materials in her sculptures but focuses mainly on paper-casting for mask-making and mild steel for nature and dream influenced sculptures. With both the masks and the metal, she is interested on exploring pairs of opposites and the healing potential in art.

The masks that she makes are from reused materials – paper grocery bags for the casting with the surface collaged on with out-of-date calendars, old magazines, cigarette packages, etc. Much of the metal she uses is also made from scraps. In a few sculptures this is obvious. They are constructed from car parts, door knobs, cake pans and other recognizable objects.

She is glad to be part of Reclaimed Room’s exhibit “for the LOVE of ART” with so many artists who are a part of the Art Nite gatherings. Making art is often such a solitary activity. Coming together, each person with their own project to work on, balances the lone time. Old friendships are strengthened and new ones are formed on Art Nite. The atmosphere is warm and supportive. Love of creativity is the unifying force.

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Art Nite participants,clockwise starting from the top left corner: Angel Gurgovits, Chula Camp,         Haideen Anderson, Dana Albany, Aaron Harlan, Dave Hasse and his mother, Kathleen Hasse.

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Chicken Wire-Glass Platter by Lauren Becker of Recycled Glassworks

Lauren Becker can occasionally be found at the yard (B R) sorting re-usable window glass and shelves for her work. The up cycling process involves cutting the glass to size and a kiln firing that softens the glass just enough to render it flexible. In this state it can be embossed with design from below, enhancing the aquatic virtues of glass and the natural aqua tint present in plate-glass. An extensive line of functional tableware with dishes, bowls and serving pieces has evolved in a wide variety of sizes. Currently working through a pile of glass display shelves from See’s Candy warehouse in Daly City, Recycled Glassworks has been diverting plate glass from Bay Area landfill since 1996. More info on her work can be found at recycledglassworks.com

 

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Chula Camp

“I am a self-taught jewelry designer and work with traditional and uncommon materials. Every collection is designed and hand-made be me one at a time. I work in a tiny art studio in the historic Dogpatch District near the central waterfront in San Francisco. I have been designing wire and glass jewelry since 2003. In 2010 I entered my first competition in the recycled category and won. The excitement of winning inspired me to explore more options of designing jewelry with broken, found or discarded trash.”

“It’s been almost a decade since the recycling design challenge. Since then I have rescued over 48 different waste items and made many pieces into reclaimed and wearable art. Some of these rescued items have included chop stick rests, retired traffic signal lenses, key hole covers, chandelier crystals, bullet casings, champagne boxes, calendars, credit card tape cores, buttons, quilter’s scraps and vintage spools..”

“I love sketching new ideas and discovering the value in what others may consider junk. Creating new jewelry from broken, found and discarded objects fulfills my current creative instinct. There is no such thing as away. When we throw anything away it must go somewhere.”

 

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Kat Pk Delurgio

“When I rediscovered crochet in 2013 there was an ‘A-ha’ moment. I was bed ridden in post-trauma-recovery, and this act of crocheting was Good Medicine. It tickles both sides of my brain as the process blends the sensual aspects (texture, color, visual aesthetics) and thinky-thinky (math & structural engineering.) The first hook I used was MacGuyver’ed from a chopstick, duct tape and a paper clip. About 95% of my materials are secondhand scores. I enjoy experimenting with non-conventional materials and find great inspiration while Crafternooning with friends!”

 

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Sconce designed by Michael Donnelly

Mike was drawn to shadows and light, natural forms, and dumpster diving at an early age. These influences are ever present in his work with lamps and light fixtures.

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Michael Donnelly with Dana Albany at Burning Man 2017

 

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Angel Gurgovits

Angel Gurgovits has been a recycler her whole life.  She has worked at Building REsources for 13 years and counting, the last two years also curating the Reclaimed Room Gallery as well. She began to make mosaic art with Dana Albany back in 2010 and the advent of Art Nite was born. The duo was joined by others and they collaborated on many great projects together, including the Youth Educational Spacecraft which toured Maker’s Fair , Burning Man and Las Vegas in 2013.

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Youth Educational Spacecraft, designed by Dana Albany

“Learning how to mosaic really changed and enriched my life. I feel like I can recycle anything into something beautiful with just a little glass and glue. My favorite projects now also include functional light fixtures,  and each day I am inspired to make more!”

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Marble Lamp, by Angel Gurgovits

 

 

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Anne Jatta

“I love knitting. Since I learned to knit in 1st grade (in Denmark), knitting has been a big part of my life. I can never just sit, must have needles in my hands. These creatures, composed of re-used materials, have been so much fun to make.”

 

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Ady Larsen

“I think of mosaic as life! When life falls apart (and our dishes) we have the option to transform the results. We pick up the pieces and glue them back together, allowing the unlimited possibility of fun colors to reflect the beauty in our world.”

 

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Pauline Tolman, adding some touches to Dana Albany’s Tara Mechani

Pauline Tolman is a San Francisco artist best known for her large scale sculpture and architectural installations. She has achieved three major public commissions as well as a number of site specific commissions. She also enjoys figurative bronze work. During the pour for one such sculpture she was fascinated by the “splash,” the over pour of bronze into the surrounding sand. The very raw, primal forms created by this splash are the core and inspiration for the wall charms displayed here.

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Bronze “Splash” Wall Charm by Pauline Tolman

 

“All of us who are in this show have spent time at the table, collaborating on something together and enjoying each others company whilst doing so. We have formed a strong bond with one another and continue to work together as often as we can. It is with great pleasure that we present this show, for the LOVE of ART.”

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Works by Connie Murray, Martha Jones and Kim Larson

 

Opening September 15th, 2017 we have a show not to be missed!!! Three incredibly talented mosaic artists will be featured together for the first time: Connie Murray, Kim Larson and returning Reclaimed Room Artist from 2013, Martha Jones.

Connie Murray

Connie Murray is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Person-Centered Expressive Arts therapist. She has been artistic all her life; doodling, building lamps, sculpture out of obscure objects, and painting the interior of her home a variety of colors. Fifteen years ago Connie began tiling household furniture as an expressive outlet not only for herself but also in her practice as a healing resource for addiction recovery. In her practice following the sequential PCEAT approach all artistic venues offer a path to personal growth and healing.

As an older adult diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Dyslexia she has found that mosaic sculpture is a perfect medium for her artistic expression. The meditative quality of mosaics provides a vehicle for gaining an in-depth understanding of life experiences, and to organize ideas. Additionally this meditative quality has allowed her to seek a graduate degree as it structures time to process research. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Psychology at San Francisco’s Saybrook University with a certification in Expressive Arts under the guidance of Natalie Rogers, PhD., REAT.

Connie’s mosaic adventure crossed over from furniture to mannequins when she was given a dancing figure and decided it was the perfect platform for expressing the frustrations of the transition through menopause. Her creations include a variety of glass, mirror and found objects in strong colors representing feelings involved with women’s issues, death and life transition, and the women who are currently or in the past have been an important part of her life.

Mosaic work by Connie Murray

 

Martha Jones at work in her studio.

As a Reuse and Upcycle artist, Martha’s work is created from discarded materials. Her quest for abandoned treasures are found on the street, in salvage yards, in thrift stores, yard sales or gifted, just to name a few.

Degreed as an Interior Designer, but with a passion for salvaging, Martha’s work is lively and humorous. Her color combinations and compositions reflect her professional training and inner talents.

“Interior Design has always been my first passion, although salvaging was a close second. I grew up just outside of Boston. I remember looking forward to trash night where you can go out and search street after street for goodies. The reuse passion never ended…things from the past have a soul.”

Mosaic work by Martha Jones

 

Kim Larson

Kim Larson’s exquisite mosaic work honors organic form as well as delights the eye. Using stained glass, broken china, recycled glass & mirror, found objects, etc as tesserae, Kim works in a playful and unique style.

“My current series, as with all my mosaics, is about the interplay between recognizable shapes and surprising textures & colors. I create very recognizable shapes (substrates) and then ‘flesh them out’ so to speak, with surprising juxtapositions of color and lay patterns. ”

“I find mosaics to be crazy-making! At times I have to admit I walk that fine line between sanity and insanity because each cut, each piece, each color, each placement has to be perfect! Specifically, I like to work with sparkly, mirrored, textured, brightly_colored glass, recycled glass and found objects. I feel like I am painting with light.”

The reflective qualities of the glass force the viewer to move around the piece to see it truly take shape and reveal itself. The recycled china, tiles and found objects create an intimacy with the viewer when recognizable things are used in new ways. “Mosaic art is not a static medium. The play of light adds an extra dimension one doesn’t find in many other art forms.”

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The show will run from September 15th through November 10th.