MUSE

Works by Connie Murray, Martha Jones and Kim Larson

 

Opening September 15th, 2017 we have a show not to be missed!!! Three incredibly talented mosaic artists will be featured together for the first time: Connie Murray, Kim Larson and returning Reclaimed Room Artist from 2013, Martha Jones.

Connie Murray

Connie Murray is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and Person-Centered Expressive Arts therapist. She has been artistic all her life; doodling, building lamps, sculpture out of obscure objects, and painting the interior of her home a variety of colors. Fifteen years ago Connie began tiling household furniture as an expressive outlet not only for herself but also in her practice as a healing resource for addiction recovery. In her practice following the sequential PCEAT approach all artistic venues offer a path to personal growth and healing.

As an older adult diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Dyslexia she has found that mosaic sculpture is a perfect medium for her artistic expression. The meditative quality of mosaics provides a vehicle for gaining an in-depth understanding of life experiences, and to organize ideas. Additionally this meditative quality has allowed her to seek a graduate degree as it structures time to process research. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Psychology at San Francisco’s Saybrook University with a certification in Expressive Arts under the guidance of Natalie Rogers, PhD., REAT.

Connie’s mosaic adventure crossed over from furniture to mannequins when she was given a dancing figure and decided it was the perfect platform for expressing the frustrations of the transition through menopause. Her creations include a variety of glass, mirror and found objects in strong colors representing feelings involved with women’s issues, death and life transition, and the women who are currently or in the past have been an important part of her life.

Mosaic work by Connie Murray

 

Martha Jones at work in her studio.

As a Reuse and Upcycle artist, Martha’s work is created from discarded materials. Her quest for abandoned treasures are found on the street, in salvage yards, in thrift stores, yard sales or gifted, just to name a few.

Degreed as an Interior Designer, but with a passion for salvaging, Martha’s work is lively and humorous. Her color combinations and compositions reflect her professional training and inner talents.

“Interior Design has always been my first passion, although salvaging was a close second. I grew up just outside of Boston. I remember looking forward to trash night where you can go out and search street after street for goodies. The reuse passion never ended…things from the past have a soul.”

Mosaic work by Martha Jones

 

Kim Larson

Kim Larson’s exquisite mosaic work honors organic form as well as delights the eye. Using stained glass, broken china, recycled glass & mirror, found objects, etc as tesserae, Kim works in a playful and unique style.

“My current series, as with all my mosaics, is about the interplay between recognizable shapes and surprising textures & colors. I create very recognizable shapes (substrates) and then ‘flesh them out’ so to speak, with surprising juxtapositions of color and lay patterns. ”

“I find mosaics to be crazy-making! At times I have to admit I walk that fine line between sanity and insanity because each cut, each piece, each color, each placement has to be perfect! Specifically, I like to work with sparkly, mirrored, textured, brightly_colored glass, recycled glass and found objects. I feel like I am painting with light.”

The reflective qualities of the glass force the viewer to move around the piece to see it truly take shape and reveal itself. The recycled china, tiles and found objects create an intimacy with the viewer when recognizable things are used in new ways. “Mosaic art is not a static medium. The play of light adds an extra dimension one doesn’t find in many other art forms.”

Three cow heads

The show will run from September 15th through November 10th.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport Me

 

 

We are thrilled to present Transport Me, a dynamic two-person exhibition featuring sculptor Kat Geng and figurative painter Jon Levy-Warren. Using the once modern -and now extinct- phone booth as a central metaphor, Transport Me investigates what it means to travel to another realm, another time or another space without actually moving. Mining found-object canvasses  sourced from the streets of San Francisco and the scrapyard, the artists have built a colorful collection of works: Geng with her playful repurposings and Levy-Warren with his portraits of refracted reverie; which explore objects and the power they have to carry us away. The exhibition will be on view July 14 through September 8, 2017 with an opening reception on Friday, July 14 from 5-7 pm.

unnamed.jpg

Visual art, music, literature, food, film, books, television, colors, sounds, smells, drugs, and technology all act as transportation vessels with the uncanny ability to tug on our imagination and memory. But where does this leave the phone booth and other relics of outmoded virtual travel? Where do these technological fossils take us? To whom do they connect us? Are they places of nostalgia? Do they transform us into Superman? Or, like Doctor Who’s Tardis, whose police booth literally can take us anywhere in space and time? By asking these questions, Geng and Levy-Warren begin the journey of discovery, examining how free thought allows us to escape our physical surroundings.

22da6510-085e-4a88-978c-aa488ddd41ba

Drawing on her transitory lifestyle, Geng’s artistic approach allows the viewer to explore her whimsical alterations and humorous point of view wherein a whole, wild universe can be accessed by stepping thru the door (or phone booth) into her creative mind. She combines found objects form a new narrative based on common associations the items hold. In so doing, she requires that her audience put forth effort as they use their imagination to travel to new and unexpected places, giving old gadgets new meaning.

d392b0fc-3077-4318-bd40-acafd74c480a

Levy-Warren creates with the intention of conveying his audience out of their physical bodies and into an otherworldly setting. Through this welcomed displacement from reality to fantasy, he encourages viewers to learn to see and understand themselves from a different perspective. The figures in his compositions are characteristically staring off into space, connected to one another in the ether, yet isolated in real life. His subjects are at once physically present and absent having transcended the material world into immaterial space.

About the Artists

As an itinerant Colombian-American artist, Geng has lived in over 100 houses in the Bay Area (as well as a dozen in Massachusetts and Mexico), becoming adept at transporting her belongings. She began her professional relationship with objects while working as an art conservator in North Adams, MA and Guanajuato, MX and continues to bring them wherever she goes. Geng has shown extensively in San Francisco, CA and was awarded artist residences at The Midway Gallery in 2016 and the Vermont Studio Center in 2017. Recently, she curated Om, I’m Home, an interactive exhibition at The Luggage Store Gallery in San Francisco and enjoyed a solo show at Counterpoise. She received a BA in Art History from Bard College, Annandale-On-Hudson, NY.

Levy-Warren grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan as a nervous wreck. There were people everywhere. He figured out that by focusing on individuals and becoming fascinated by them, the masses of humanity and the world itself faded away.  He has spent his life allowing himself to be transported into other people’s little worlds. He studied film and video making alongside drawing, painting and printmaking as an undergraduate at Princeton University. Levy-Warren lived in Brooklyn, NY and Stockholm, Sweden before beginning to bounce around the Bay Area in 2012. He continues to be inspired primarily by people and their environs. He has shown extensively at galleries in San Francisco, including the Luggage Store Gallery.

 

 

departure

departure is the work of these five material driven artists: Tim Armstrong, Ramiro Cairo, Katerina Connearney, Miles Epstein and Rachel Leibman. They are gathering together for the first time to create an art and shopping experience in the most immersive way possible, in a place where things “just show up”. Innovated objects will be presented in a way that can inspire you to see them in a different light. The show opens Friday, May 12th and will run thru July 7th.

 

 

Tim Armstrong

“Of economic necessity and invention, I have discovered a way to make monotype prints with materials salvaged from dumpsters. My skull prints are made using tar paper, mop heads and camping fuel gathered from dumpsters near construction sites and homeless encampments, I like the simple suggestion of a burning fuse. Mounted on the back of each print is the original collage. The wall sized work is an experiment using old car gaskets, stove burners and instant coffee. Originally conducted on a cement floor, the drawing was then coated with elastomeric roof paint and burlap and peeled off the ground. I am mainly interested in using undiscovered processes as an artist, in containing a method as it leads to a metaphor.”

 

Debris Mural

Skull Print

 

Ramiro Cairo

 

Ramiro Cairo is an Argentine artist, based in San Francisco. His speciality is the reuse of disused objects and technological scrap, creating works of art and design, such as TV mirrors, TV coffee tables, circuit board lamps, vacuum tube figurines and sculptures in limited editions.

“Most of my work navigates the space between design and art, between functionality and personality, combining creativity, surprise, humor and reuse. I’m motivated by finding a different use for objects originally built for a particular  purpose. My challenge is to find them a new line of work, giving them an extended lifespan and making them useful again.”

“Bricks for good is my latest work in which I make objects out of bricks. The tape dispenser is the first object of this series in which the pieces are shaped by chiseling down the brick as if it was a sculpture, using a hammer, chisels and an angle grinder. Why bricks? Well, I just want to give them a good use instead using them for a nonsensical Wall.”

 

Tape Dispenser

 

Katerina Connearney

Katerina Connearney is a figurative artist and woodworker originally from Greece and currently living in San Francisco. In this exhibit, the focus is on making functional furniture pieces from (almost) all recycled or reclaimed materials. The majority of the materials were, appropriately enough, found here at Building Resources. “One never knows what beautiful and promising bit of rusty metal or weathered wood one will come across when ambling around (the yard), and more often than not we go home with these treasures not knowing why or how we will use them. The fun is in playing with them – rearranging, bending, taking apart, putting back together, and eventually seeing what is recreated.”

 

BR Cabinet

 

Miles Epstein

“This is the second time I’ve had the opportunity to show work at The Reclaimed Room and I am honored and inspired to be showing with four other talented artists. We all know this space in our own way, and all work very independently and in different materials: brick, canvas, wood, plastic and metal, objects of interest, tissue and paper.”

“Of note is the name of this show. Hanging out at the yard I am most inspired when someone leaves with something encouraging, be it an idea, an inspiration, or a doorknob. departure speaks to the inspiration of the material object.”

 

 

 

tissue painting – blue head

 

Rachel Leibman

Rachel Leibman is a mixed media artist from San Francisco. Her artwork spans the gamut from tiny two-dimensional collages to room-sized installations. The unifying thread in all her pieces is repetitiveness and obsessive attention to detail. Leibman’s process is extremely meticulous and labor-intensive.

For the “departure” exhibit, Leibman has chosen to display two large installations from her “Vessels” series. “Elijah Makes the Rounds” is composed from vintage kiddish cups; goblets used in Jewish rituals such as Passover seders. With a sly sense of humor, this piece evokes sweet childhood memories. “Daily Dose” is composed from hundreds of plastic prescription pill bottles, collected from Leibman’s friends, family, and her own personal stash. This piece is a commentary on the state of the pharmaceutical industry in the U.S.

Leibman’ artwork has been exhibited in numerous solo and group shows on both coasts. Her collages are part of many private and public collections including Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco, American Airlines HQ in Dallas, and the Art Collection at the Hebrew Home in New York City.

Elijah Makes the Rounds

Daily Dose

 

 

CLINT: a one man show with Clint Imboden opens JULY 11th

CLINT

 

Last year’s SCRAP show first prize winner and reclaimed room artist of the past takes over the gallery with a unique sampling of his work.  Clint Imboden is a collector of all things.  He molds found objects into new structures that imbue them with life.  Always in conversation with his audience, Clint is a master of design on all scales.  This show invites you to take part in the art, with an interactive installation, and contemplate the bold shapes and containers of past lives and past times.

Join us July 11th for our first one man show with Clint Imboden.

Reception: 4:30pm

Food, drinks, fun and FREE!

701 Amador Street, SF 94124

DSC_0231

 

CARNAGE opens March 28th!

Carnage

The bold works of our featured artists recall animalistic themes, creating order from chaos and influences from the Southern Hemisphere.  The pieces all have textures, layers and commanding visuals that will excite and engage the viewer.  CARNAGE explores identity through various mediums, each artist presenting works that evoke a unique signature through leather burning, fork and spoon sculpture and assemblage.  Featuring the creations of artists Tanya Herrera, William Rhodes and Jemison Beshears.  Learn more about each of the artists below and join us Mar 28th to meet the makers!

 

 

CARNAGE is on display March 28-May21.

Opening Reception MAR 28 4:30-6:30pm, 701 Amador Street

TanyaHerreraHS

Tanya Herrera

It’s hard to write about your relationship to art when you’ve been making art since you can remember. It’s like trying to describe how you started walking, you just did at some point and have kept moving forward ever since. Both my parents were never drastically artistic, but I am the youngest of three siblings, and both my sister and brother were huge influences growing up. Everyone dabbles in art as a kid, but when I was about 8 my sister studied fine art at college in San Francisco and always came home with interesting projects and wonderful new tools and art supplies I never got to see in my art class in elementary school. My brothers illustrative and musical abilities further inspired me, I was considerably more enthralled after that. Where the three of us got the art bug, my parents never knew, but they supported our abilities and always were open to our goals.

I learned early on the hardships of being a fine artist, and surviving on the very little that you earn. As much as I loved making fine art, when thinking about my career as an adult, I decided to be creative in the design world as a graphic designer. I did this knowing in the future a design job would support my slowly blossoming fine art career. I went into college with the notion that I would one day return to my art and once I had become successful designer. I became an In-House designer in Portland Oregon, and made art and participated in shows for 5 years there before moving back to the bay area where I was born and raised.

My art consists of an accumulation of many different techniques I have learned over many years of experimentation and collaboration with fellow artists. I have also been influenced by the growing amount of waste going to landfills and the beauty one can find in objects that some would consider garbage. I try not constrain myself with materials, techniques or genres. Instead I open my mind to making art with what I am given and attempt to unlock the inner beauty that can be found in any object. Each piece is VERY unique and could probably never be duplicated, even if I wanted to try. Please enjoy my many years of hard work, and see there will be many more to come!

 

William Rhodes Headshot - Color

William Rhodes

I began my creative journey at the Baltimore School for the Arts.  I later earned a BA in Furniture Building and Design from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and a MFA from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth.

My creative works are in the collections of various galleries and museums and featured in several major publications. I strive to blend fine craft, sculpture and design with meaning and function. I explore themes of hidden knowledge, iconographic imagery and forms and how they can change meaning in a given cultural context. My art has been strongly influenced by my extensive travels, particularly to Africa, Asia, and Central and South America. The people, art and cultures of these societies have inspired me to consider non-Western approaches to art and sculpture. Explorations into the contrast between these traditional cultures and our modern one have also added depth to the narrative quality of my work. Additionally, recycled materials are an important component of my work as purposeful support for recycling. By reusing discarded materials I give objects new value and a second life.

williamrhodesart.com

 

JemisonBeshearsHS

Jemison Beshears

I have always enjoyed old things, the way they look, made to last, refined. Used with care and better looking when showing the scars of life. Found or discarded objects that performed some individual task in the past, now left to become a character ingredient in a visual poem…At beaches, at flea markets or antique stores…the things I have encountered on my road through life…Out the corner of the eye. An old toolbox, marbles, blocks of text, a glass mercury ball…at one time utilitarian, now chosen for its shape, color or patina. I try to marry formalism with bygone utility. Hopefully, being intimate without being sentimental.

 

Impressions of Bayview opens TODAY! Featured Artists: Keith Wilson and Mariana Nelson

Bayview

 

Opening Reception: January 17th, 4:30-6:30pm

FOOD, DRINKS, FREE

701 Amador Street, 94124, SF

 

Our last two featured artists, Keith Wilson and Mariana Nelson, compliment the black and white photography with otherworldly sculptures and painstaking Japanese temari work all created from recycled materials.

keith_wilson_headshot_300dpi_blackwhite

 

KEITH WILSON

Keith Wilson is a filmmaker and visual artist based in San Francisco. His film work has been exhibited at Sundance, the Berlinale, South by Southwest and the U.S. National Gallery of Art.

 

In addition to recent solo photography shows at the Martina Johnston Gallery in Berkeley and the SOFA Gallery in Austin, his artist book ALL THE BUILDINGS ON BURNET ROAD (2010) was exhibited at the Gagosian Gallery and the Brandhorst Museum as part of the exhibit Ed Ruscha & Co. His photography books HYDE PARK APARTMENTS (2011) and SEE I SAW (2015) were recently published by Publication Studio and he is the co-creator (with Shannon O’Malley) of the book GAY MEN DRAW VAGINAS (2014). In 2009, he began the ongoing interactive performance THE CAVE & MOUNTAIN TOUR, which was featured at the 2013 Fusebox Festival in Austin, Texas. In the Spring of 2015, his books, films and performances will be presented at the University of Georgia where he will be a Visiting Artist.

Keith received his MFA in film production from the University of Texas-Austin. He grew up on a cul-de-sac in suburban Atlanta but currently lives high atop Bernal Hill.
KeithWilson_Sculpture
MarianaNelsoHS

MARIANA NELSON

Mariana Nelson was born and raised in Southern California.  She grew up in Newport Beach and moved to San Francisco in her early 20′s.  In San Francisco she became involved in a thriving and inspired art community where she found her focus on reusing existing materials.

She began wrapping discarded materials she found at reuse centers or even from the street.  She used a thousand year old Japanese technique to wrap called Temari.  After years of wrapping and practice she soon developed a pattern and way to wrap that was unique to her.  Anything from lint and dog hair to found plastic and paper was wrapped with bright and colorful fiber, transforming literal trash into something completely unrecognizable.

As her collection of small colored Temari grew – she began to find ways of assembling them together to create large pieces.  Mariana’s current body of work involves using hundreds of wrapped forms to create one unified piece.  Some of her work explores the idea of dark matter – while other compositions focus mostly on color and shape.  She is just starting to work with plastic garbage.  Coffee lids and lids from fast food chains found on her walks with her dog.

dark_matter_main

Impressions of Bayview Featured Artist: Mitch Nelles

Mitch Nelles Headshot

Impressions of the Bayview

Opening Reception: January 17th 4:30pm-6:30pm

701 Amador Street

Food, Drinks, FREE

 

MITCH NELLES

Mitch Nelles was born in New York City in 1953 and grew up in New Jersey.  It was during his senior year at Rutgers College that he was first introduced to the “magic” of photography. Mitch had completed all of his required course work for his undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences and signed up for a photography course, which had a print portfolio for a final exam. This class gave him his first (and only) experience in the conventional darkroom.

Upon graduating from college, Mitch moved to Texas to pursue his Ph.D. in BioMedical Sciences and then to Massachusetts for his postdoctoral training.  He moved back to New Jersey in 1986 and focused his attention to his growing family and job as a research scientist in the medical diagnostics field.  Family and work during those years left little time for photography beyond documenting vacations and family events.  Yet, as he entered middle age, he became acutely aware of his need for a creative outlet.

Mitch was in his mid-forties when he made the decision to get back into photography.  Content at first to have his film sent out for printing at a local photo lab, he missed the artistic control he remembered from his darkroom experience in college.  Fortunately, during this period, digital image technology had become readily available and affordable for non-professionals. It became clear to Mitch that the digital darkroom was the way to go.  Film scanners, inkjet printers, Photoshop, and digital SLRs provided him with all the tools and control needed to produce high quality prints that met his creative and artistic expectations.

Following his move to Raleigh, North Carolina in 2001, Mitch joined the Capital City Camera Club where he met a group of like minded, supportive photographers who got together monthly to critique each other’s work and provide encouragement. He credits this small circle of friends with giving him the confidence in his photographic pursuits and helping him to see how different artists view the world photographically and express their individual creativity.

Mitch is self-trained and credits a wide variety of contemporary photographers for helping to shape his photographic vision and literacy. Chip Forelli, Roman Loranc, Chris Honeysett, Clyde Butcher, William Neill, and David Fokos have had a significant impact on his approach to photography.

Mitch works in the San Francisco bay area in the biotechnology field and lives in Half Moon Bay with his wife Janet. He has three daughters, Sara, Miriam, and Erica, who are the joys of his life. Now that he lives in California, he and Janet get a lot more visits from out of town family and friends.

Mitch’s work is available for purchase by contacting him at mitchnelles@gmail.com

 

One-Way-4739-X2